Preventing Child Abuse: Critical Roles and Multiple Perspectives

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Vincent J Palusci, MD, MS (Editor) – Professor, Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, NY, USA
Frank E. Vandervort, JD (Editor) – Clinical Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School, MI, USA
Donald E Greydanus, MD, Dr HC (Athens), FAAP, FIAP (HON) (Editor) – Professor & Founding Chair, Department of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA
Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc (Editor) – Professor of Pediatrics at the Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky, Lexington, United States and Professor of Public Health at the Center for Healthy Development, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, United States, the former Medical Director of the Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem and the Founder and Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Israel

Series: Pediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health

BISAC: FAM001010

When we think of child abuse, we imagine several different forms of harmful parenting and injuries to children. Most are not visible to the naked eye, but can be seen if you look more deeply. X-rays can detect fractures and other imaging can find internal injury and bleeding, but most maltreated children have more long-lasting harm that reveals itself through behavioral and emotional maladjustment, developmental delay, sadness, and other destructive behaviors later in childhood, adolescence and into adulthood. These injuries to their personality, sense of self, relationship to society and mental health change the trajectory of their lives and dim their potential, with social and financial costs for safety, treatment and their lost personal growth. We think of these as affecting everybody’s children and that the responsibility lies with everyone to respond. This is why we put together this book: to address prevention from a number of perspectives and a variety of professions. We hope that it successfully brings together a number of disciplines and perspectives to address child abuse and neglect among the world’s families, governments and cultures. We hope that those reading these chapters will realize that there are replicable best practices that can be reliably implemented based on child and family experiences and needs rather than single approaches designed to attack single forms of maltreatment, and we look forward to the day that books like these are not needed.

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Description

Dedication

Section I: Introduction

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Expanding Case for Prevention
(Vincent J Palusci, Frank E Vandervort, Donald E Greydanus and Joav Merrick – New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States, et al.)

Chapter 2. The Case for Prevention: Epidemiology and Impact of Child Abuse and Neglect
(Vincent J Palusci – New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States)

Section II: Universal Strategies

Chapter 3. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Prevention of Child Maltreatment in the United States
(Frank E Vandervort – Child Advocacy Law Clinic and Juvenile Justice Law Clinic, University of Michigan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States)

Chapter 4. Federal Funding and The Prevention of Child Maltreatment
(Frank E Vandervort – Child Advocacy Law Clinic and Juvenile Justice Law Clinic, University of Michigan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States)

Chapter 5. Pathways to Prevention: Prevention Zones as a Strategy for Making Progress in Child Maltreatment Prevention
(Debangshu Roygardner, Kelli Hughes and Vincent J Palusci – APSAC Center for Child Policy, Columbus, Ohio, United States)

Chapter 6. Economic Supports for Families
(J Bart Klika and Catherine Murphy – Prevent Child Abuse America, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

Chapter 7. Home Visiting to Prevent Maltreatment
(Timothy Hathaway, Jenn O’Connor, and Erika Leveillee – Prevent Child Abuse New York, Troy, New York, United States of America)

Chapter 8. No Hit Zones in Context: Changing Norms through Planned Change
(Lucien X. Lombardo, Stacie LeBlanc and Viola Vaughan-Eden – Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, The UP Institute, New Orleans and Ethelyn R Strong School of Social Work, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia, United States of America)

Chapter 9. Using Technology in Child Welfare and Child Abuse Prevention
(Joshua Siegel and Vincent J Palusci – Michigan State University College of Engineering, East Lansing, Michigan and New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America)

Chapter 10. The Media and Child Abuse Prevention
(Frank E Vandervort – University of Michigan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America)

Chapter 11. Creating a National Foundation to End Child Abuse and Neglect
(Richard D Krugman and Lori E Poland – University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, et al.)

Section III: Targeted Problems and Populations

Chapter 12. Infant Crying and the Prevention of Abusive Head Trauma
(Ronald Graham Barr, University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Ryan Steinbeigle, National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome, Farmington, Utah, United States of America)

Chapter 13. Eliminating Corporal Punishment
(Joan Durrant – Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada)

Chapter 14. Disability and Abuse: Some International Aspects
(Joav Merrick – National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel, et al.)

Chapter 15. A Critical Analysis of Efforts to Prevent the Sexual Abuse of Youth
(Jon Conte, June Simon and Ann Luetzow – Joshua Center on Child Sexual Abuse Prevention, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, US)

Chapter 16. Child Abuse Prevention in the Faith-Based Environment
(Angelo Peter Giardino, Victor Vieth, Shira Berkovits and Danielle Pitkoff – University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, Zero Abuse Project, Saint Paul, Minnesota Sacred Spaces, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America)

Chapter 17. Adolescent Abuse: Selective Issues Including Prevention
(Donald E Greydanus and Joseph R Hawver – Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States of America, et al.)

Chapter 18. Preventing Athlete Harm in Youth Sports
(Aliza Lipman, Erin McConnell, Keith Kaufman and Angelo Peter Giardino – Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, et al.)

Chapter 19. Prevention of Human Trafficking in Children
(Dena Nazer – Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, United States of America)

Chapter 20. Child Fatality Review and Programs to Prevent Child Maltreatment Deaths
(Robert Parrish, Abby Collier, Erich Batra, Vincent J Palusci and Frank E Vandervort – Salt Lake City Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, Salt Lake City, Utah, et al.)

Section IV: Professional Issues

Chapter 21. Health-based Interventions
(Wendy Gwirtzman Lane, Howard Dubowitz and Rebecca Weinstein – University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America)

Chapter 22. Preventing Child Maltreatment Through Medical-Legal Partnership
(Debra Chopp – University of Michigan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States)

Chapter 23. Prevention Services Through Child Protective Services
(Janet Rosenzweig – American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, Columbus, Ohio, United States)

Chapter 24. Does Mandatory Reporting Have a Place in a More Prevention-Focused Child Maltreatment System?
(Kelli Hughes and Frank E Vandervort – The APSAC Center for Child Policy and the Institute for Human Services, Columbus, Ohio, et al.)

Section V: Acknowledgements

Chapter 25. About the editors

Chapter 26. About the Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine and Bellevue Hospital, New York, New York, United States

Chapter 27. About the Child Advocacy Law Clinic, School of Law, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

Chapter 28. About the Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States

Chapter 29. About the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel

Section VI: Index

Index

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