Sin Hang Lee, M.D. graduated from Wuhan Medical College in China. After a residency-fellowship in pathology at Cornell-New York Hospital and Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases in New York City, Dr. Lee was certified by the American Board of Pathology and obtained the F.R.C.P. (C) degree by examination in 1966. He was on the faculty of McGill University from 1968 to 1971 and then on the faculty of Yale University from 1971 to 2004 while practicing pathology at the Yale-affiliated teaching hospitals. Dr. Lee is currently the director of Milford Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Milford, Connecticut. In the past 15 years, Dr. Lee has developed Sanger sequencing-based testing methods for human papillomavirus (HPV), Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Lyme disease borreliae and SARS-CoV-2 implementable in community hospitals. Dr. Lee also found HPV L1 gene DNA fragments bound to insoluble aluminum salt nanoparticles in the HPV vaccines Gardasil4 and Gardasil9 and suggested that these residual HPV DNA may function as toll-like receptor 9 agonist in boosting innate immune response during HPV vaccination.

Sin Hang Lee, MD Director, Milford Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory Milford, CT

Sin Hang Lee, M.D. graduated from Wuhan Medical College in China. After a residency-fellowship in pathology at Cornell-New York Hospital and Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases in New York City, Dr. Lee was certified by the American Board of Pathology and obtained the F.R.C.P. (C) degree by examination in 1966. He was on the faculty of McGill University from 1968 to 1971 and then on the faculty of Yale University from 1971 to 2004 while practicing pathology at the Yale-affiliated teaching hospitals. Dr. Lee is currently the director of Milford Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Milford, Connecticut. In the past 15 years, Dr. Lee has developed Sanger sequencing-based testing methods for human papillomavirus (HPV), Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Lyme disease borreliae and SARS-CoV-2 implementable in community hospitals. Dr. Lee also found HPV L1 gene DNA fragments bound to insoluble aluminum salt nanoparticles in the HPV vaccines Gardasil4 and Gardasil9 and suggested that these residual HPV DNA may function as toll-like receptor 9 agonist in boosting innate immune response during HPV vaccination.

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