Nils-Axel (“Niklas”) Mörner took his Ph.D.-thesis in 1969 in Quaternary Geology with special emphasis on Marine Geology at Stockholm University, Sweden. In his thesis he was able to separate the isostatic and eustatic components behind the relative sea level changes on the Swedish West Coast and in the Kattegatt Sea as recorded by a spectrum of 40 synchronous shorelines followed over about 300 km in the direction of tilting and dated by numerous C14-dates. His eustatic curve recorded a low-amplitude oscillating sea level rise after the Last Ice Age – contrary to the high-amplitude curve of Fairbridge (1961) and the smooth curve of Shepard (1963). His curve offered the possibility of assessing global sea level records with respect to coastal stability and eustasy (his thesis in 1969 and a paper in Paleo-3 in 1971). He soon realized (Geol. en Mijnbow, 1971; Journal of Geology, 1976) that global eustasy had to be different over the globe due to geoidal eustasy. Therefore, in 1986, he redefined the concept of eustasy (JCR, SI-1). In 1984, he introduced the concept of Super- ENSO events and horizontal redistribution of oceanic water masses. He was president of the INQUA Commission of Sea Level Changes and Coastal Evolution (1999-2003), and leader of the Maldives Sea level Project (2000-2007). In 2008, he was awarded “The Golden Condrite of Merits” from Algarve University “for his irreverence and contribution to our understanding of sea level change”.
He found and coined a geomagnetic excursion known as “the Gothenburg Excursion” occurring 12.4 C14-yrs ago in 1971, and built up “the Stockholm Paleomagnetic Laboratory (in operation 1973-2005). In the 1980s he wrote several papers on solar-terrestrial questions (to re-appear now in the 2010s). He was co-ordinator of the INTAS project on Geomagnetism & Climate (1997-2003). He has been a pioneer in paleoseismology over the last 30 years. He has published extensively in a large number of scientific fields. He has personal field experiences from 59 different countries.
He has been editor of several books and special issues: “Earth Rheology, Isostasy and Eustasy” (Wiley, 1980), “Climate Change on a Yearly to Millennial Basis” (Kluwer, 1984), “Paleoseismicity and Neotectonics” (Tectonophysics, 1989), “The Tsunami Threat: research and technology” (InTech, 2011), “Pattern in Solar Variability, their Planetary Origin and Terrestrial Impact” (PRP, 2013), “Geochronology: methodology and case studies” (InTech, 2014).
He was postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Geology at Western University, London, Ontario, Canada (1969/70), consultant in Physics at Instituto Fisico in Salvador, Brazil (1979), and guest scientist at Dept. Geologie Quatarnaire in Marseill, France (1980/81). He held a personal associate professorship at the Swedish National Research Council (1978-2005) and was head of the department of Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics at Stockholm University (1991-2005).

Nils-Axel Mörner
Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics, Stockholm, Sweden
Nils-Axel (“Niklas”) Mörner took his Ph.D.-thesis in 1969 in Quaternary Geology with special emphasis on Marine Geology at Stockholm University, Sweden. In his thesis he was able to separate the isostatic and eustatic components behind the relative sea level changes on the Swedish West Coast and in the Kattegatt Sea as recorded by a spectrum of 40 synchronous shorelines followed over about 300 km in the direction of tilting and dated by numerous C14-dates. His eustatic curve recorded a low-amplitude oscillating sea level rise after the Last Ice Age – contrary to the high-amplitude curve of Fairbridge (1961) and the smooth curve of Shepard (1963). His curve offered the possibility of assessing global sea level records with respect to coastal stability and eustasy (his thesis in 1969 and a paper in Paleo-3 in 1971). He soon realized (Geol. en Mijnbow, 1971; Journal of Geology, 1976) that global eustasy had to be different over the globe due to geoidal eustasy. Therefore, in 1986, he redefined the concept of eustasy (JCR, SI-1). In 1984, he introduced the concept of Super- ENSO events and horizontal redistribution of oceanic water masses. He was president of the INQUA Commission of Sea Level Changes and Coastal Evolution (1999-2003), and leader of the Maldives Sea level Project (2000-2007). In 2008, he was awarded “The Golden Condrite of Merits” from Algarve University “for his irreverence and contribution to our understanding of sea level change”. He found and coined a geomagnetic excursion known as “the Gothenburg Excursion” occurring 12.4 C14-yrs ago in 1971, and built up “the Stockholm Paleomagnetic Laboratory (in operation 1973-2005). In the 1980s he wrote several papers on solar-terrestrial questions (to re-appear now in the 2010s). He was co-ordinator of the INTAS project on Geomagnetism & Climate (1997-2003). He has been a pioneer in paleoseismology over the last 30 years. He has published extensively in a large number of scientific fields. He has personal field experiences from 59 different countries. He has been editor of several books and special issues: “Earth Rheology, Isostasy and Eustasy” (Wiley, 1980), “Climate Change on a Yearly to Millennial Basis” (Kluwer, 1984), “Paleoseismicity and Neotectonics” (Tectonophysics, 1989), “The Tsunami Threat: research and technology” (InTech, 2011), “Pattern in Solar Variability, their Planetary Origin and Terrestrial Impact” (PRP, 2013), “Geochronology: methodology and case studies” (InTech, 2014). He was postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Geology at Western University, London, Ontario, Canada (1969/70), consultant in Physics at Instituto Fisico in Salvador, Brazil (1979), and guest scientist at Dept. Geologie Quatarnaire in Marseill, France (1980/81). He held a personal associate professorship at the Swedish National Research Council (1978-2005) and was head of the department of Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics at Stockholm University (1991-2005).

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