Lolita Nikolova (born 1959) is a leading Bulgarian American scientist who uniquely combines expertise in prehistoric archaeology, genealogy, theory of culture, and cultural genomics. Her broad education from Bulgaria and the U.S. includes a master’s degree in History with a second major in philosophy, a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology, an associate degree in multimedia, and a PhD in prehistory. She is also an EdD candidate in postsecondary and higher education (Argosy University). Dr. Nikolova is a professor at and CEO of Open Global Research Academy (Salt Lake City, Utah, US & Karlovo, Bulgaria), the third generation evolved research institution, following Prehistory Foundation and the International Institute of Anthropology. She also has been teaching academic courses related to her expertise and has provided professional genealogical research on the European genealogical and cultural origin (especially Eastern European, Italian, and German origins).
Dr. Nikolova is the author of numerous peer-reviewed books and articles in the fields of prehistory, theory, and genealogy, which are distributed worldwide, and is in the top 2 percent of globally recognized authors at academia.edu. Cultural genomics is a new field of her research, constituted with this original monograph. She is the first scientist to build a framework of this new discipline bonding archaeology, genealogy, and genetics to study the evolution of cultural identity—the most important constructor of human personality relating to the different types of social grouping, with primary impact on the evolution of human civilization. Her scientific thesis is that genomics requires very strong integration with archaeology, genealogy, and other related disciplines to be able to develop the quality knowledge that human civilization needs in modern times. Genomics has changed the dynamics of human cultural identity and has been personalizing the human history since genomics in combination with genealogical and archaeological evidence guides the search of individual origin even in the ancient past.

Lolita Nikolova
Professor and CEO of Open Global Research Academy, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Lolita Nikolova (born 1959) is a leading Bulgarian American scientist who uniquely combines expertise in prehistoric archaeology, genealogy, theory of culture, and cultural genomics. Her broad education from Bulgaria and the U.S. includes a master’s degree in History with a second major in philosophy, a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology, an associate degree in multimedia, and a PhD in prehistory. She is also an EdD candidate in postsecondary and higher education (Argosy University). Dr. Nikolova is a professor at and CEO of Open Global Research Academy (Salt Lake City, Utah, US & Karlovo, Bulgaria), the third generation evolved research institution, following Prehistory Foundation and the International Institute of Anthropology. She also has been teaching academic courses related to her expertise and has provided professional genealogical research on the European genealogical and cultural origin (especially Eastern European, Italian, and German origins). Dr. Nikolova is the author of numerous peer-reviewed books and articles in the fields of prehistory, theory, and genealogy, which are distributed worldwide, and is in the top 2 percent of globally recognized authors at academia.edu. Cultural genomics is a new field of her research, constituted with this original monograph. She is the first scientist to build a framework of this new discipline bonding archaeology, genealogy, and genetics to study the evolution of cultural identity—the most important constructor of human personality relating to the different types of social grouping, with primary impact on the evolution of human civilization. Her scientific thesis is that genomics requires very strong integration with archaeology, genealogy, and other related disciplines to be able to develop the quality knowledge that human civilization needs in modern times. Genomics has changed the dynamics of human cultural identity and has been personalizing the human history since genomics in combination with genealogical and archaeological evidence guides the search of individual origin even in the ancient past.

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