Professor Jonathan E. Leightner started studying sacred scriptures as a child. At first he concentrated on the sacred scriptures of Judaism and Christianity. When he earned a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Philosophy, he took as many world religion and world philosophy courses as possible. During that time, he especially studied Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. In the middle of his Master’s degree, he taught conversational English in a small town in Northern Thailand. In Thailand he saw lepers begging on street corners, a dead, bloated body float down the Mekong River, and people in slums living off of a dollar per day. In 1989, with the goal of someday helping countries like Thailand, he earned a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with primary fields in Economic Development and Comparative Economic Systems. Since earning his Ph.D., he has taught in the USA, Japan, China, and Thailand. His publications contain many details on the relationship between economics and religion/ethics. He has also written and published three other books.

Jonathan Leightner, PhD Full Professor, Augusta University, Lincolnton, Georgia, USA

Professor Jonathan E. Leightner started studying sacred scriptures as a child. At first he concentrated on the sacred scriptures of Judaism and Christianity. When he earned a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Philosophy, he took as many world religion and world philosophy courses as possible. During that time, he especially studied Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. In the middle of his Master’s degree, he taught conversational English in a small town in Northern Thailand. In Thailand he saw lepers begging on street corners, a dead, bloated body float down the Mekong River, and people in slums living off of a dollar per day. In 1989, with the goal of someday helping countries like Thailand, he earned a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with primary fields in Economic Development and Comparative Economic Systems. Since earning his Ph.D., he has taught in the USA, Japan, China, and Thailand. His publications contain many details on the relationship between economics and religion/ethics. He has also written and published three other books.

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