• I was a student for ten years. At the University of Redlands, which is a small independent liberal arts university, I changed my major three times. Following a master’s degree at the University of Redlands, I ended up in speech science which is also called experimental phonetics. As it is a blend of acoustics, physiology, psychology, and phonetics; it spans the physical sciences, social sciences, and humanities. It provides some of the theoretical and experimental support for the work of speech-language pathologists, thus there are clinical and interprofessional experiences in my background. After five years as a doctoral student in speech science at the University of Washington, which is a large research-based state university, I spent another year at the University of Washington as a postdoctoral researcher in the Departments of Orthodontics and Physiology & Biophysics.
• In 1977, I began as a faculty member at the University of Iowa. For the first nine years, I was consumed by research and supporting a series of research grants from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. I taught regularly during this time, but my emphasis was with graduate teaching. I especially wanted to groom doctoral students to embrace my theoretical perspectives and to carry on similar lines of research. I wanted them to think like me and to have values like mine. Undergraduate teaching was a responsibility that I accepted as a necessary distraction. I liked it, but I had a full plate and there was always a struggle to keep the research support to fund the close-knit team in the laboratory. During this time, much of my teaching was in providing scientific background to undergraduate majors in speech-language pathology and audiology. These students wanted to learn the skills to be a clinicians. Often they didn’t see the need to learn about science or to care about the theory and evidence underlying their future clinical activities. When I think back on it, at that time I was very traditional in my approach to teaching. I thought the job of an instructor was to cover material clearly and comprehensively. If one interjected some jokes in a lecture, that was good even if the jokes might have been off topic and distracting. At least the instructor was entertaining. I was among the last professors one might imagine writing the present book. The one exception to my preoccupation with research was my experience teaching an introductory class surveying the disciplines of speech-language pathology and audiology. I realized early the power of introductory courses.
• In 1985, I became Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. This is one of the oldest and largest departments preparing speech-language pathologists and audiologists in the country. I soon became immersed in many administrative duties, including faculty assessment, strategic planning, and curricular issues for both undergraduate and graduate programs. In addition to continuing research and teaching, I expanded national service activities such as editing two scholarly journals and serving on the Advisory Council for one of the National Institutes of Health: The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. In 1992, as a representative of this Council, I served on a strategic planning task-force for the entire National Institutes of Health, thus advising federal funding for medical research across the country.
• In 1993, I began as an Associate Provost at the University of Iowa. In my first years as Associate Provost, I focused on strategic planning, accountability, and reaccreditation. Later the focus shifted more to undergraduate education. However, throughout this time I dealt with curriculum design; innovative teaching and learning; influences of technology on teaching; classroom design; and student support services including the offices of the Registrar, Admissions, Financial Aid, Student Evaluation and Testing, and Undergraduate Academic Advising. I attended Faculty Senate meetings, served on the Board in Control of Athletics, acted as the Library Liaison to central administration, and was a reviewer for the University of Iowa Press. I was active with national groups promoting technology in college teaching, such as Educause and the National Learning Infrastructure Initiative. It took a few years, but my interests and passions changed from research in speech production to innovations, not just in teaching, but to the entire learning experience of students.
• In 2000, I became Provost at Bowling Green State University. For seven years, I dealt with the wide variety of academic issues one would expect the provost of a research-based state university to handle. Much of the focus related to faculty support and welfare as we had 850 to 900 faculty members. Bowling Green State University is a large institution and there were initiatives in many areas, some were similar to the work done at the University of Iowa, but as Provost instead of Associate Provost, the domain was expanded. Through the years, my passion became more and more directed to improving student learning and faculty research.
• In 2007 I left the position of Provost and became the founding Chief Executive Officer of a new nonprofit company that was owned by the University, the Bowling Green State University Research Institute. Its mission was to find innovative work done by the faculty, such as: ideas that were patentable, work that was copyrightable, or faculty know-how; and then to work with business and industry to develop new products and services. Many of these projects involved innovative teaching materials. I was chosen because of how well I knew the faculty members and their values. I could convince professors to step from the laboratory long enough to promote their work. This emphasis of the BGSU Research Institute on engagement between researchers and the business community was a great example of how engagement with the community can be a valuable learning experience for students. I continued in this position for two years as the company got started.
• From 2009 to 2015, I served as a full-time faculty member. This was the first time since 1985 I had had full-time faculty responsibilities. I loved it. In addition to teaching, I served on national committees and boards. I also served the University in a number of ways, including being elected as Chair of the Faculty Senate and receiving the University’s Distinguished Service Award. During this time, I developed a program of scholarly research about innovative teaching. It was based on my years of administrative experience, but it was tested in the classroom on a daily basis. I was also involved in a number of campus-wide initiatives to get faculty members discussing their innovations in teaching. There were faculty discussion groups on video-games and student motivation; understanding student misconceptions about science; syllabus design; and a group that organized forums for faculty members to present new ideas about teaching to their peers.

John Wm. Folkins
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Emeritus, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, USA
• I was a student for ten years. At the University of Redlands, which is a small independent liberal arts university, I changed my major three times. Following a master’s degree at the University of Redlands, I ended up in speech science which is also called experimental phonetics. As it is a blend of acoustics, physiology, psychology, and phonetics; it spans the physical sciences, social sciences, and humanities. It provides some of the theoretical and experimental support for the work of speech-language pathologists, thus there are clinical and interprofessional experiences in my background. After five years as a doctoral student in speech science at the University of Washington, which is a large research-based state university, I spent another year at the University of Washington as a postdoctoral researcher in the Departments of Orthodontics and Physiology & Biophysics. • In 1977, I began as a faculty member at the University of Iowa. For the first nine years, I was consumed by research and supporting a series of research grants from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. I taught regularly during this time, but my emphasis was with graduate teaching. I especially wanted to groom doctoral students to embrace my theoretical perspectives and to carry on similar lines of research. I wanted them to think like me and to have values like mine. Undergraduate teaching was a responsibility that I accepted as a necessary distraction. I liked it, but I had a full plate and there was always a struggle to keep the research support to fund the close-knit team in the laboratory. During this time, much of my teaching was in providing scientific background to undergraduate majors in speech-language pathology and audiology. These students wanted to learn the skills to be a clinicians. Often they didn’t see the need to learn about science or to care about the theory and evidence underlying their future clinical activities. When I think back on it, at that time I was very traditional in my approach to teaching. I thought the job of an instructor was to cover material clearly and comprehensively. If one interjected some jokes in a lecture, that was good even if the jokes might have been off topic and distracting. At least the instructor was entertaining. I was among the last professors one might imagine writing the present book. The one exception to my preoccupation with research was my experience teaching an introductory class surveying the disciplines of speech-language pathology and audiology. I realized early the power of introductory courses. • In 1985, I became Chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa. This is one of the oldest and largest departments preparing speech-language pathologists and audiologists in the country. I soon became immersed in many administrative duties, including faculty assessment, strategic planning, and curricular issues for both undergraduate and graduate programs. In addition to continuing research and teaching, I expanded national service activities such as editing two scholarly journals and serving on the Advisory Council for one of the National Institutes of Health: The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. In 1992, as a representative of this Council, I served on a strategic planning task-force for the entire National Institutes of Health, thus advising federal funding for medical research across the country. • In 1993, I began as an Associate Provost at the University of Iowa. In my first years as Associate Provost, I focused on strategic planning, accountability, and reaccreditation. Later the focus shifted more to undergraduate education. However, throughout this time I dealt with curriculum design; innovative teaching and learning; influences of technology on teaching; classroom design; and student support services including the offices of the Registrar, Admissions, Financial Aid, Student Evaluation and Testing, and Undergraduate Academic Advising. I attended Faculty Senate meetings, served on the Board in Control of Athletics, acted as the Library Liaison to central administration, and was a reviewer for the University of Iowa Press. I was active with national groups promoting technology in college teaching, such as Educause and the National Learning Infrastructure Initiative. It took a few years, but my interests and passions changed from research in speech production to innovations, not just in teaching, but to the entire learning experience of students. • In 2000, I became Provost at Bowling Green State University. For seven years, I dealt with the wide variety of academic issues one would expect the provost of a research-based state university to handle. Much of the focus related to faculty support and welfare as we had 850 to 900 faculty members. Bowling Green State University is a large institution and there were initiatives in many areas, some were similar to the work done at the University of Iowa, but as Provost instead of Associate Provost, the domain was expanded. Through the years, my passion became more and more directed to improving student learning and faculty research. • In 2007 I left the position of Provost and became the founding Chief Executive Officer of a new nonprofit company that was owned by the University, the Bowling Green State University Research Institute. Its mission was to find innovative work done by the faculty, such as: ideas that were patentable, work that was copyrightable, or faculty know-how; and then to work with business and industry to develop new products and services. Many of these projects involved innovative teaching materials. I was chosen because of how well I knew the faculty members and their values. I could convince professors to step from the laboratory long enough to promote their work. This emphasis of the BGSU Research Institute on engagement between researchers and the business community was a great example of how engagement with the community can be a valuable learning experience for students. I continued in this position for two years as the company got started. • From 2009 to 2015, I served as a full-time faculty member. This was the first time since 1985 I had had full-time faculty responsibilities. I loved it. In addition to teaching, I served on national committees and boards. I also served the University in a number of ways, including being elected as Chair of the Faculty Senate and receiving the University’s Distinguished Service Award. During this time, I developed a program of scholarly research about innovative teaching. It was based on my years of administrative experience, but it was tested in the classroom on a daily basis. I was also involved in a number of campus-wide initiatives to get faculty members discussing their innovations in teaching. There were faculty discussion groups on video-games and student motivation; understanding student misconceptions about science; syllabus design; and a group that organized forums for faculty members to present new ideas about teaching to their peers.

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