For the past three decades, the author, David S. Younger MD, MPH, MS has been a clinician, educator, and more recently, public health researcher and advocate. Dr. Younger is an authority in the use of immunotherapy to treat child and adult immunologically-mediated neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. He has edited or authored several books, including Motor Disorders 3rd Edition, The Vasculitides, Human Lyme Neuroborreliosis, and Global and Domestic Public Health and Neuroepidemiology; and is writing the popular book, The Autoimmune Brain; and Neuroepidemiology: The Basics and Beyond. He has additionally authored more than 250 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and abstracts and is staff member in the Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroepidemiology, of New York University (NYU) where he provides methodologic expertise in clinical research study design, biostatistical support, and the formulating research questions.

Dr. Younger obtained his MD degree from Columbia P&S in 1981, afterward entering internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Montefiore Hospital, and completing while returning to Columbia University Neurological Institute to start his first year in residency, straddling the two worlds. He continued his training in three postdoctoral fellowships: epilepsy and electroencephalopathy, clinical neuromuscular disease and electrodiagnosis; and clinical trials at the Neurological Institute where he was mentored by “Bud” Rowland, Chairman of the Department of Neurology, and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Neurology. He stayed at Columbia University as an Assistant Professor of Neurology until he moved to New York University (NYU) becoming Clinical Associate Professor, and the first Chief of Neuromuscular Disease.

Frustrated by the lack of connection with larger populations and understanding disease risks and public health policy reform, he entered NYU’s College of Global Public Health Master in Public Health program followed by Master degree training in epidemiology at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health. Urged further by colleagues and family to obtain leadership and research training in public health, Dr. Younger embarked on a doctoral program in Health Policy and Management at City University of New York’s School of Public Health in the fall of 2017 where he anticipates graduating with a PhD degree in 2020.

It was during the doctoral program of the past year that his interest medical marijuana piqued, as he recognized the immense scientific and public health aspects of the drug citing four reasons for pursuing the present book. First, curiosity in the medical scientific aspects of the endocannabinoid system in the brain and immune system. Second, the effectiveness of medical marijuana in promoting healing and alleviating the suffering of many patients. Third, public health aspects associated with the legalization of marijuana and dispensing it in the many formulations of medical cannabis. Lastly, the paucity of public health policy research evaluating the experience of stakeholders, cost effectiveness and benefit analyses associated with medical cannabis compared to other treatments.

David Steven Younger
Department of Neurology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, US
For the past three decades, the author, David S. Younger MD, MPH, MS has been a clinician, educator, and more recently, public health researcher and advocate. Dr. Younger is an authority in the use of immunotherapy to treat child and adult immunologically-mediated neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. He has edited or authored several books, including Motor Disorders 3rd Edition, The Vasculitides, Human Lyme Neuroborreliosis, and Global and Domestic Public Health and Neuroepidemiology; and is writing the popular book, The Autoimmune Brain; and Neuroepidemiology: The Basics and Beyond. He has additionally authored more than 250 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and abstracts and is staff member in the Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroepidemiology, of New York University (NYU) where he provides methodologic expertise in clinical research study design, biostatistical support, and the formulating research questions.

Dr. Younger obtained his MD degree from Columbia P&S in 1981, afterward entering internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Montefiore Hospital, and completing while returning to Columbia University Neurological Institute to start his first year in residency, straddling the two worlds. He continued his training in three postdoctoral fellowships: epilepsy and electroencephalopathy, clinical neuromuscular disease and electrodiagnosis; and clinical trials at the Neurological Institute where he was mentored by “Bud” Rowland, Chairman of the Department of Neurology, and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Neurology. He stayed at Columbia University as an Assistant Professor of Neurology until he moved to New York University (NYU) becoming Clinical Associate Professor, and the first Chief of Neuromuscular Disease.

Frustrated by the lack of connection with larger populations and understanding disease risks and public health policy reform, he entered NYU’s College of Global Public Health Master in Public Health program followed by Master degree training in epidemiology at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health. Urged further by colleagues and family to obtain leadership and research training in public health, Dr. Younger embarked on a doctoral program in Health Policy and Management at City University of New York’s School of Public Health in the fall of 2017 where he anticipates graduating with a PhD degree in 2020.

It was during the doctoral program of the past year that his interest medical marijuana piqued, as he recognized the immense scientific and public health aspects of the drug citing four reasons for pursuing the present book. First, curiosity in the medical scientific aspects of the endocannabinoid system in the brain and immune system. Second, the effectiveness of medical marijuana in promoting healing and alleviating the suffering of many patients. Third, public health aspects associated with the legalization of marijuana and dispensing it in the many formulations of medical cannabis. Lastly, the paucity of public health policy research evaluating the experience of stakeholders, cost effectiveness and benefit analyses associated with medical cannabis compared to other treatments.

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