“Waste-to-Profit” (W-t-P): Circular Economy in the Construction Industry for a Sustainable Future. Volume 2

Linda Zikhona Linganiso and Tshwafo Elias Motaung (Editors)
University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa

Series: Construction Materials and Engineering
BISAC: TEC005000

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$230.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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The concept of a circular economy in the construction sector captures global material flow through product design, inverse logistics, innovation and collaborations. The circulation of the economy takes into consideration global population influence, which affects the economy through a variety of construction product flows in particular. The increase in consumers means increasing product and services which participate in different waste streams. The emerging sustainable development in the construction industry requires the recycling of waste materials to reduce the negative environmental impact of construction activities. Accumulation and management of construction wastes is also becoming a major environmental and economical concern in many developing countries.

Huge volumes of waste generated end up piled on landfill sites or illegally dumped, posing serious health and ecological problems. In the construction industry, recycling of waste concrete, masonry, cement, gypsum, to mention but a few, has become an important aspect due to the continued increase of construction wastes and depletion of natural aggregates. Why not establish a business system that is specifically designed to do much more value addition to the construction wastes and develop products which are not only in demand locally but internationally, to encourage exports for maximum financial gain. This book aims to analyze the current business model in the construction sector and the current legislation concerning waste management. It also highlights efforts required in order to refine the recycling methods in favor of a circular economy in the constuction industry.

In support of a transition to a low carbon economy, different types of materials which can be produced from the construction wastes are indicated including processes which are used to obtain the final products. The market demand including penetration of the resulting products are given extensively. Policies and regulations to govern these undertakings are highlighted also. The municipalities will learn to redirect the local construction industries on how to avoid dumping at landfill sites as the space has currently become an issue. Researchers globally will learn how to go up through the Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) from basic research through prototype development and finally up to commercialization in projects related to the construction.
(Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1. Transformation from a Linear to a Sustainable Circular Economy in the Construction Sector
(Tshwafo E. Motaung, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa)

Chapter 2. Recycled Cement and Mansonry
(Tshwafo E. Motaung, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa)

Chapter 3. Recycled Gypsum Board Applications
(Thabiso Ntombela, Linda Z. Linganiso, Tshwafo E. Motaung and Muzi O. Ndwandwe, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa)

Chapter 4. Stone Waste and Sustainability
(Nduduzo L. Khumalo, Linda Z. Linganiso, Tshwafo E. Motaung and Muzi O. Ndwandwe, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, South Africa)

Chapter 5. Polyurethane (PU) and Sustainability
(Nthabeleng Hlapisi, Linda Z. Linganiso, Tshwafo E. Motaung, Sandile P. Songca, Oluwafemi Oluwatobi, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa)

Chapter 6. Recycled Concrete
(Linda Z. Linganiso, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa,KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa)

Chapter 7. Recycled Ceramic Tile
(Linda Z. Linganiso, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa)

Chapter 8. Cardboard and Paper for Pulping in Construction
(Tshwafo E. Motaung, Thulani Shabangu, Linda Z. Linganiso and Muzi O. Ndwandwe, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, South Africa)

Chapter 9. Use of Ceramic and Porcelain Earthenware Tile Wastes in Mastic Asphalt Mixture for Road and Footpath Construction
(J. S. Sefadi, M. J. Mochane, N.J. Malebo and T.C. Mokhena, School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Sol Plaatje University, Kimberley, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 10. Recycling Copper Scrap for Primary and Secondary Uses
(Thembinkosi D. Malevu, Zolile Mtumela and Benard S. Mwankemwa, School of Chemistry and Physics, Westville campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 11. Luminescent Materials for Building and Construction
(Francis B. Dejene, Tshwafo E. Motaung, Setumo V. Motloung, Lehlohonolo F. Koao, Linda Z. Linganiso, Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Phuthaditjhaba, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 12. Soft and Hard Plastic Waste Materials Used in Construction
(J.S. Sefadi, M.J. Mochane, N.J. Malebo and T.C. Mokhena, Sol Plaatje University, School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Kimberley, South Africa, and others)

Chapter 13. Value Addition to Waste Metals
(Shesan J. Owonubi, Linda Z. Linganiso, Tshwafo E. Motaung and Sandile P. Songca, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal)

Chapter 14. Wood and Its Byproducts: Cascading Utilisation for Biomass (Re)Generation
(Shesan J. Owonubi, Linda Z. Linganiso, Tshwafo E. Motaung and Sandile P. Songca, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaDlangezwa, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa)

Chapter 15. Policies and Regulations in the Construction Sector
(Tshwafo E. Motaung, Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, KwaZulu-Natal, KwaDlangezwa, South Africa)

Index

Keywords: Waste beneficiation, Municipal solid waste, Fly ash, Lime Powder, Policies and Regulations, Construction and Demolition Wastes, Waste Management hierarchy

Audience:
1. Construction sector
2. Manufacturing industry
3. Mining
4. Transportation sector
5. Governmental entities (TIA, DTI, DBSA)
6. Waste managers
7. Funding agencies
8. Municipalities
9. Academics
10. Students (honors, MSc and PhD)
11. Business people
12. Research councils (CSIR etc)
13. Libraries
14. Politicians

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