War: An Introduction to Theories and Research on Collective Violence, 2nd Edition

Tor Georg Jakobsen (Editor)
Postdoctoral Researcher, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway

Series: Defense, Security and Strategies
BISAC: POL000000

Clear

$360.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

eBook

Digitally watermarked, DRM-free.
Immediate eBook download after purchase.

Product price
Additional options total:
Order total:

Quantity:

Details

War describes a situation of armed conflict between two or more parties. There are several ways in which we can classify wars. The major division in the academic literature is between interstate wars and civil wars. The former is fought out between two or more states; the latter between groups belonging to the same state. There exists a vast literature, a large part of it quantitative, on both types of conflict. The majority of wars are civil wars. This book introduces the reader to the concept of war, and also to the different schools of thought as well as to the research methods pertaining to this area of research. It is an edited book containing articles written by several causes of war researchers. War is an important subject of study.

The nature of war has changed over time, leaving the civilian population increasingly vulnerable. It has negative impacts beyond the direct casualties and the damaged infrastructure and economy in the countries in question. This book is intended to reach a wide audience, ranging from Bachelor and Master students in the social sciences, as well as to researchers and others with an interest for the subject. The aim of this work is both to give an outline of the literature, as well as providing examples of different schools of thought within the ‘causes of war’ literature. It gives the reader a comprehensive account of the research on ‘causes of war’, ranging from the old classics, like e.g., Clausewitz and Sun Tzu, to up-to-date research. The contributors in this book are chosen to represent a variety of perspectives on the causes of conflict.
(Imprint: Nova)

Foreword
Nils Petter Gleditsch and Ola Listhaug

Introduction

I. Collective Violence

Chapter 1 - The Onset of Civil War (pp. 3-18)
Sugumaran Narayanan and Karl R. DeRouen Jr. (Political Science Department, Midwestern State University, Wichita Falls, Texas, US and others)

Chapter 2 - Theories of Collective Violence: The Continuing Rational Actor versus Deprived Actor Debate (pp. 19-34)
Tor G. Jakobsen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

Chapter 3 - Civil Wars in International Relations: Patterns, Consequences, and Conditions of Termination (pp. 35-58)
Jacob Bercovitch and Carmela Lutmar (School of Political Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel)

Chapter 4 - Irregular Warfare (pp. 59-72)
Torbjørn L. Knutsen (Department of Sociology and Political Science Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim, Norway)

Chapter 5 - Modern War (pp. 73-92)
Geir K. Almlid and Per Marius Frost-Nielsen (Department of Language and Literature, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway)

Chapter 6 - Cain‘s Choice: Causes of One-Sided Violence against Civilians (pp. 93-118)
Gerald Schneider, Lilli Banholzer and Roos Haer (Professor of International Politics at the University of Konstanz, Germany and others)

II. Cultural Factors and Conflict

Chapter 7 - Ethnicity Matters, but What Kind? A Review of the Quantitative Literature of Ethnicity and Conflict (pp. 121-140)
Tanja Ellingsen (Department of Sociology and Political Science Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

Chapter 8 - Macro- and Micro-Level Theories of Violence in Ethnic and Non-Ethnic Civil Wars (pp. 141-154)
Ravi Bhavnani and Dan Miodownik (Department of International Relations / Political Science, The Graduate Institute Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland and others)

Chapter 9 - Civilizations: Value Differences and Conflict (pp. 155-164)
Tor G. Jakobsen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

III. Development, Resources and Trad

Chapter 10 - Globalization and Insurgent Financing (pp. 167-180)
Rune T. Slettebak (Rogaland County Authority, Stavanger, Norway)

Chapter 11 - Economic Policies and Armed Conflict: The Promise of Globalization (pp. 181-200)
Indra de Soysa (Department of Sociology and Political Science Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

Chapter 12 - Political Institutions and Internal Armed Conflict: A Review (pp. 201-216)
Tore Wig (Department of Political Science, University of Oslo and Peace Research Institute, Oslo, Norway)

Chapter 13 - Diasporas and Civil War (pp. 217-236)
Jonathan Hall (Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden)

Chapter 14 - Adding Fuel to the Flames? Multinational Companies Operating in Zones of Conflict (pp. 237-256)
Jo Jakobsen (Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

IV. Geography and War

Chapter 15 - Geography and War: Avoiding the Curse of High Geopolitics (pp. 257-278)
Steve Pickering (Kobe University, Kobe, Japan)

Chapter 16 - Civil War and the Transnational Diffusion of Violence (pp. 279-302)
Jacob D. Kathman (Department of Political Science, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, US)

Chapter 17 - Cursed by Resources? High-Value Natural Resources and Armed Civil Conflict (pp. 303-324)
Päivi Lujala (Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

V. Interstate Conflicts

Chapter 18 - Modern Conflicts: World System and Wars in Three Different Military Eras (pp. 327-334)
Eirik B. Lundestad and Tor G. Jakobsen (Hedmark University-College, Rena, and Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)

Chapter 19 - Issues and Conflict (pp. 335-356)
Sara McLaughlin Mitchell and Paul R. Hensel (Department of Political Science, University of Iowa, US and others)

Chapter 20 - The Rivalry Approach to Conflict: Great Promises and Potential Problems (pp. 357-372)
Tove Grete Lie (Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway)

Chapter 21 - Norway and the 2005 Elektron Affair: Conflict of Competencies, and Competent Realpolitik (pp. 373-402)
Gunnar Fermann and Tor Håkon Inderberg (Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Oslo, Norway)

About the Contributors

Index

Audience: Bachelor and Master students of political science, as well as academically employed who are interested in studies of war.

You have not viewed any product yet.