Urticaria: Prevalence, Etiologies and Treatment Options

Suran Fernando, PhD (Editor)
Royal North Shore Hospital, Leonards, Australia

Series: Dermatology – Laboratory and Clinical Research
BISAC: MED017000

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Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Urticaria is a common condition, affecting up to 20% of the population at some stage in their lives. It is an important entity to recognize and differentiate from other similar presenting conditions, and the clinician ideally needs to be aware of the numerous forms and presentations of urticaria, which varies in terms of severity, chronicity, extent of organ involvement, therapeutic options and prognosis.
The book contains 18 chapters, 17 of which are focused on a specific area of importance in this disease.

After introducing the topic and discussing the epidemiology of urticaria, the book then comprehensively examines acute urticaria, the various forms of inducible urticaria, urticarial vasculitis and chronic spontaneous urticaria, a relatively novel term that encompasses chronic autoimmune urticaria and chronic idiopathic urticaria. There is a chapter dedicated to urticaria in children as well as a chapter describing the use of basophil activation tests in chronic urticaria. The final three chapters are devoted to the treatment of urticaria; first line therapies, the role and options of immunosuppression and the emerging use of omalizumab.

The chapters have been written by clinicians and experts in the area from various renowned institutions with the aim of providing a comprehensive yet practical guide to general physicians, dermatologists, clinical immunologists, allergists and emergency physicians who encounter the problem of urticaria in their practice. (Imprint: Nova Biomedical )

Preface and Introduction

Chapter 1 - Prevalence and Epidemiology of Urticaria (pp. 1-14)
David Heyworth-Smith (The Greenslopes Private Hospital, and QML Pathology, Murarrie, Queensland, Australia)

Chapter 2 - Acute Urticaria (pp. 15-34)
Suran Fernando and Annika Smith (Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Royal North Shore Hospital, and Sydney Medical School-Northern, Sydney University, Sydney, Australia)

Chapter 3 - Contact Urticaria (pp. 35-50)
Kathryn Ruda Wessell, Erin C. Toller-Artis, Haig Tcheurekdjian and Robert Hostoffer (Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, and Allergy/Immunology Associates, South Euclid, and University Hospitals Regional Hospitals Richmond Heights, Ohio, United States of America)

Chapter 4 - Cholinergic Urticaria (pp. 51-58)
Satoshi Nakamizo, Gyohei Egawa and Kenji Kabashima (Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan)

Chapter 5 - Urticaria Factitia and Dermographism (pp. 59-66)
Anca Chiriac, Elena Ardelean and Caius Solovan (Dermato-Physiology Department, Apollonia University, Iasi, Romania and others)

Chapter 6 - Delayed Pressure Urticaria (pp. 67-76)
Gino Antonio Vena and Nicoletta Cassano (Dermatology and Venereology Private Practice, Bari and Barletta, and University of Bari, Italy)

Chapter 7 - Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis (pp. 77-86)
Jennifer Chen and Jason Lee (Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada)

Chapter 8 - Cold Contact Urticaria (pp. 87-104)
Suran Fernando (Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Royal North Shore Hospital, and Sydney Medical School-Northern, Sydney University, Sydney, Australia)

Chapter 9 - Solar Urticaria (pp. 105-118)
Aurélie Du-Thanh and Jean-Louis Peyron (Department of Dermatology, Hospital Saint-Eloi, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France)

Chapter 10 - Aquagenic Urticaria (pp. 119-126)
Alan Baptist, Timothy Franxman and Laura Howe (Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America)

Chapter 11 - Vibratory Angioedema (pp. 127-130)
Cataldo Patruno and Maddalena Napolitano (Department of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy)

Chapter 12 - Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria (pp. 131-138)
Jamma Li and Suran L. Fernando (Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Royal North Shore Hospital and Sydney Medical School-Northern, Sydney University, Sydney, Australia)

Chapter 13 - Basophil Activation Tests in Chronic Autoimmune Urticaria (pp. 139-150)
Edit Gyimesi and Andrea Szegedi (Division of Clinical Immunology, Departments of Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Hungary)

Chapter 14 - Urticarial Vasculitis (pp. 151-162)
Andrew J. Broadfoot (Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia)

Chapter 15 - Urticaria in Children (pp. 163-174)
Brynn Wainstein and Katie Frith (Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Sydney Children’s Hospital and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)

Chapter 16 - First Line Therapies in the Management of Chronic Urticaria (pp. 175-184)
Kathryn Patchett (Immunology, Pathology North Hunter, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, Australia)

Chapter 17 - Immunosuppressive Therapy in Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria (pp. 185-208)
Gary A. Unglik and Priscilla Auyeung (Immunology and Allergy Department, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, and Molecular Medicine Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne, Australia)

Chapter 18 - The Use of Omalizumab in Chronic Urticaria (pp. 209-220)
Jamma Li and Suran L. Fernando (Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Royal North Shore Hospital, and Sydney Medical School-Northern, Sydney University, Sydney, Australia)

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