U.S. Wilderness: Overview, Congressional Issues and Selected Laws

Gianna A. Kirby (Editor)

Series: Environmental Remediation Technologies, Regulations and Safety
BISAC: POL044000

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$140.00

Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Congress enacted the Wilderness Act in 1964. This act created the National Wilderness Preservation System, reserved to Congress the authority to designate wilderness areas, and directed the Secretaries of Agriculture and of the Interior to review certain lands for their wilderness potential. The Wilderness Act defined wilderness as an area of undeveloped federal land, but, due to differing perceptions of wilderness and its purpose, did not establish criteria or standards to determine whether an area should be designated.

In general, wilderness areas are undeveloped, and commercial activities, motorized access, and roads, structures, and facilities are generally prohibited in wilderness areas. This book presents background information on wilderness protection and a discussion of issues in the wilderness debate – the pros and cons of wilderness designation; possible considerations for specific legislation; and a discussion of possible wilderness study area designation and protection. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1 - Wilderness: Overview and Statistics (pp. 1-18)
Katie Hoover

Chapter 2 - Wilderness: Legislation and Issues in the 113th Congress (pp. 19-46)
Katie Hoover, Kristina Alexander, Sandra L. Johnson

Chapter 3 - Wilderness Laws: Statutory Provisions and Prohibited and Permitted Uses (pp. 47-152)
Kristina Alexander, Katie Hoover

Index

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