Trade Secrets: Theft Issues, Legal Protections and Industry Perspectives

Wilfred Clarkson (Editor)

Series: Business Issues, Competition and Entrepreneurship
BISAC: BUS083000

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$140.00

Volume 10

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Volume 2

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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A trade secret is confidential, commercially valuable information that provides a company with a competitive advantage, such as customer lists, methods of production, marketing strategies, pricing information, and chemical formulae. Well-known examples of trade secrets include the formula for Coca-Cola, the recipe for Kentucky Fried Chicken, and the algorithm used by Google’s search engine. To succeed in the global marketplace, U.S. firms depend upon their trade secrets, which increasingly are becoming their most valuable intangible assets.

However, U.S. companies annually suffer billions of dollars in losses due to the theft of their trade secrets by employees, corporate competitors, and even foreign governments. Stealing trade secrets has increasingly involved the use of cyberspace, advanced computer technologies, and mobile communication devices, thus making the theft relatively anonymous and difficult to detect. This book discusses the theft issues, legal protections and industry perspectives on trade secrets. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1 - Protection of Trade Secrets: Overview of Current Law and Legislation (pp. 1-46)
Brian T. Yeh

Chapter 2 - Stealing Trade Secrets and Economic Espionage: An Overview of 18 U.S.C. 1831 and 1832 (pp. 47-70)
Charles Doyle

Chapter 3 - The Role of Trade Secrets in Innovation Policy (pp. 71-92)
John R. Thomas

Chapter 4 - Statement of Randall C. Coleman, Assistant Director, Counterintelligence Division, FBI. Hearing on ''Economic Espionage and Trade Secret Theft: Are Our Laws Adequate for Today‘s Threats?'' (pp. 93-100)

Chapter 5 - Statement of Peter L. Hoffman, Vice President, Intellectual Property Management, The Boeing Company. Hearing on ''Economic Espionage and Trade Secret Theft: Are Our Laws Adequate for Today‘s Threats?'' (pp. 101-106)

Chapter 6 - Testimony of Douglas K. Norman, Vice President and General Patent Counsel, Eli Lilly and Company. Hearing on ''Economic Espionage and Trade Secret Theft: Are Our Laws Adequate for Today‘s Threats?'' (pp. 107-112)

Chapter 7 - Testimony of Richard A. Hertling, of Counsel, Covington & Burling LLP. Hearing on ''Trade Secrets: Promoting and Protecting American Innovation, Competitiveness and Market Access in Foreign Markets'' (pp. 113-120)

Chapter 8 - Statement of David M. Simon, Senior Vice President for Intellectual Property, Salesforce.com, Inc. Hearing on ''Trade Secrets: Promoting and Protecting American Innovation, Competitiveness and Market Access in Foreign Markets'' (pp. 121-132)

Chapter 9 - Testimony of Thaddeus Burns, Senior Counsel, Intellectual Property & Trade, General Electric. Hearing on ''Trade Secrets: Promoting and Protecting American Innovation, Competitiveness and Market Access in Foreign Markets" (pp. 133-140)

Chapter 10 - Testimony of Chris Moore, Senior Director, International Business Policy, National Association of Manufacturers. Hearing on ''Trade Secrets: Promoting and Protecting American Innovation, Competitiveness and Market Access in Foreign Markets'' (pp. 141-146)

Index

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