The Traditional Sakkiya Practice: A Public Health Issue in Northern Nigeria

Kehinde K. Kanmodi (Editor)
Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Ibadan, Nigeria; Dental Clinic, Kebbi Medical Centre, Kalgo, Nigeria; National Teachers’ Institute, Kaduna, Nigeria; Department of Political Sciences, National Open University of Nigeria, Abuja, Nigeria; Nigerian Institute of Management (Chartered), Abuja, Nigeria ; Chartered Institute of Project Management, Lagos, Nigeria
Campaign for Head and Neck Cancer Education (CHANCE) Program, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Ibadan, Nigeria
Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
Community Health Officers Training Programme, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc, (Editor)
Medical Director, Health Services, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Adolescent Medicine, KY Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centers, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Series: Alternative Medicine, Health and Wellness
BISAC: MED004000

Clear

$82.00

eBook

Digitally watermarked, DRM-free.
Immediate eBook download after purchase.

Product price
Additional options total:
Order total:

Quantity:

Details

Sakkiya is a Hausa word, which has its origin from the Hausa culture, and it means the act of using hot pointed metallic tip to puncture bodily swelling with the aim of achieving a curative effect. The Hausa culture is one of the three most popular cultures in Nigeria. The Hausas are predominantly located in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria, predominantly working as farmers.

The majority of the Hausa people practice the Islamic religion. Encounters from the medical setting with cases of complications arising from failure of Sakkiya treatment, where some patients did not survive this treatment made investigation into this form of alternative medicine a paramount issue. In order to fill the void of information and literature on Sakkiya treatment, the authors embarked on a literature search and field studies resulting in this book. The authors found a lack of historical evidence concerning the old traditional Sakkiya practice, and therefore urge archaeologists, anthropologists, sociologists and historians to investigate into the historical evolution of Sakkiya practice in northern Nigeria.

Dedication

Preface

Chapter 1. Northern Nigeria: An Overview
(Almu Bello, Miracle A. Adesina and Kehinde K Kanmodi, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Sokoto, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 2. Sakkiya and Orthodox Medicine in Nigeria: A Compared Narrative
(Miracle A. Adesina, Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Omotayo F Fagbule and Almu Bello, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc., Ibadan, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 3. Sakkiya Practice in Northern Nigeria: Is There Any Existing Scientific Literature?
(Kehinde Kanmodi, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Sokoto, Nigeria and others)

Chapter 4. Caregiver Reports on the Socio-Economic and Safety Issues Associated with Sakkiya Treatment: A Survey of a Neglected Area in Nigerian Healthcare
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Olanrewaju I. Owoeye and Godwin U. Ndubuizu, Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 5. Cause for Concern on the Negative Health Implications of the Traditional Sakkiya Treatment: Evidence from a Survey of Clinicians Domiciled in a Northern Nigerian Academic Hospital
(Kehinde Kanmodi, Godwin Ndubuizu and Olanrewaju Owoeye, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Sokoto, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 6. Are Caregivers Doing Enough Concerning Sakkiya Education?: Evidence from a Hospital Survey
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Olanrewaju I. Owoeye and Godwin U. Ndubuizu, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Sokoto, and others)

Chapter 7. The Sakkiya Doctor and the Sakkiya Clinic: Findings from Field Work
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Bello Almu, Suwaiba Sani and Saidu Ibrahim, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Sokoto, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 8. Sakkiya Training and Practice
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Bello Almu, Suwaiba Sani, Saidu Ibrahim, Andrew M. Owadokun, Oluwatoyin R. Adeniyi, Blessing A. Adeogun, MD, and Abimbola G. Akinloye, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Sokoto, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 9. Sakkiya Practice in the "North": A Gaze into the Past, the Present, and the Future
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Taiwo T. Oluwafisayo and Miracle A Adesina, Cephas Health Research Initiative Inc, Ibadan, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 10. Achieving a Successful Sakkiya Education Program in the "North"
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Health Research Initiative Inc, Ibadan, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 11. Sakkiya Research: A Call for Multidisciplinary Collaborations
(Kehinde K. Kanmodi, Health Research Initiative Inc, Ibadan, Nigeria, and others)

Chapter 12. About the Editors

Chapter 13. About the Cephas Health Research Initiative, Inc. in Nigeria

Chapter 14. About the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel

Chapter 15. About the Book Series “Alternative Medicine, Health and Welfare”

Index

You have not viewed any product yet.