The Theory and Practice of Terrorism: Alternative Paths of Inquiry

Elena Mastors (Editor)
Dean of Faculty, University of Phoenix, Bainbridge Island, WA, USA

Rhea Siers (Editor)
Scholar-In-Residence, Center for Cyber and Homeland Security, George Washington University.

Series: Terrorism, Hot Spots and Conflict-Related Issues
BISAC: POL037000

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Terrorism studies has grown exponentially in the last decade. However, gaps still remain in the analysis of terrorism from the compilation of data to the examination of specific case studies in an effort to discern trends, such as in the radicalization of individuals across cultural, religious, and gender lines. This book focuses on a central question that will be answered by a diverse group of academic and professional experts on terrorism: what are the current gaps in terrorism studies, and how can focusing on these gaps better inform our policy and operational decision-making. These experts provide their analysis of what is missing in the study of terrorist activities, groups, and the use of political violence. They also illustrate these gaps by applying theories that inform the understanding of terrorist behavior and focus on different paths of inquiry.

Preface

Chapter 1. Gaps in the Study of Terrorism
Elena Mastors and Rhea Siers (College of Humanities and Sciences, University of Phoenix, Tempe, AZ, USA, and others)

Chapter 2. Terrorist Criminal Enterprises
Kimberley L. Thachuk and Rollie Lal (Global Perspectives Group, George Washington University, Washington DC, USA)

Chapter 3. Lessons from the Demise of the Abu Nidal Organization
Rhea Siers and Elena Mastors (Center for Cyber and Homeland Security, George Washington University, Washington DC, USA, and others)

Chapter 4. Reverse use of Organizational Development Theory: a Unique Methodology for Analyzing and Disrupting Terrorist Organizations
Jennifer Hesterman (Counterterrorism Expert)

Chapter 5. Securing the Heartland: An Integrative Approach
Joe Harris (Capella University, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA)

Chapter 6. The Challenge of Intelligence Analysis for Terrorism: A Simulation
Rhea Siers, J.D. (Center for Cyber and Homeland Security, George Washington University, Washington DC, USA)

Chapter 7. Mass Mediated Misconceptions of Female Terrorists
Audrey Alexander (Center for Cyber and Homeland Security, George Washington University, Washington DC, USA)

Chapter 8. Strategies to Counter Violent Extremism
Lorenzo Vidino, Seamus Hughes and Katerina Papatheodorou (Program on Extremism, George Washington University, Washington DC, USA)

Chapter 9. Terrorism's Root Causes: Presenting Alternatives to Counter-Terrorism Strategies not Justification for Terrorism
Joseph H. Campos II (Departement of Political Science, University of Hawaii, Mânoa, Hanolulu, HI, USA)

Chapter 10. Evaluating the Social Conditions Encouraging Hypermasculinity that Lead to Joining and Engaging in Terrorist Groups
Christopher Miller (College of Humanities and Sciences, University of Phoenix, Tempe, AZ, USA)

Chapter 11. Zuhd: The Role of Asceticism in Islamist Extremism
Kristen McQuinn (College of Humanities and Sciences, University of Phoenix, Tempe, AZ, USA)

Index

Our book talks about terrorism, and all the chapters deal with debates surrounding this topic. Terrorism is in the news every single day around the world. Most of the authors discuss terrorism in the context of Al-Qaeda and affiliated groups around the world such as Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

This book informs several audiences; academic, policy, and operational decision makers.
In the academic community, this book can be used as by professors as a text to drive discussions in classes on political violence and terrorism. It can also be used as a supplemental reader in theoretical courses on psychology, sociology, political science, and history that address the topic of political violence.
The policy community is composed of policy decision makers and analysts who work in intelligence, defense, diplomacy, homeland security, and justice, who rely on informed analysis to drive or supplement their thinking on political violence and terrorism.
Operational decision makers such as those in the military or intelligence community are those who make tactical decisions on political violence and terrorism.

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