The Silver Conclave: Heroes, Heroines and Villains of English Literature

$190.00

Luke Strongman
Independent Researcher, MRSNZ, Lower Hutt, New Zealand

Series: Fine Arts, Music and Literature
BISAC: LIT004120

The Silver Conclave presents a critical analysis and reflection on fifty heroes, heroines and villains of English and American literature, folklore, history, film and graphic art. The characters are discussed as individual figures critiqued from the novels and narratives of their authors’ invention. The chronology of characters spans from the eleventh century and the English legend of the robber-prince ‘Robin of Sherwood,’ to Ian Fleming’s suave double-agent James Bond, who has battled forces of corruption for MI6 in fiction and in film since the mid-twentieth century, to J. K. Rowling’s intelligent modern witch, Hermione Granger, from the ever-popular ‘Potterverse’ in the early twenty-first century. Individually, or as a collection of character and plot summaries or vignettes, a range of characters are presented who have enlightened (or darkened) the popular imagination in novels, television and film. The narrative of The Silver Conclave is chronological, providing discussion about heroic and villainous figures primarily from English and American literary sources, arranged according to the year of publication. (Imprint: Nova)

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1. The Legend of Robin Hood

Chapter 2. William Shakespeare’s – Macbeth

Chapter 3. Guy Fawkes

Chapter 4. John Milton’s – Satan

Chapter 5. Jonathan Swift’s – Lemuel Gulliver

Chapter 6. Jane Austen’s – Elizabeth Bennett

Chapter 7. Mary Shelley’s – Frankenstein

Chapter 8. Charlotte Brontë’s – Jane Eyre

Chapter 9. Emily Brontë’s – Catherine Earnshaw

Chapter 10. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s – Hester Prynne

Chapter 11. Charles Dickens’s – Pip

Chapter 12. Lewis Carroll’s – Alice

Chapter 13. H. Rider Haggard’s – Allan Quatermain

Chapter 14. Robert Louis Stevenson’s – Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Chapter 15. Arthur Conan Doyle’s – Sherlock Holmes

Chapter 16. Thomas Hardy’s – Tess of the d’Urbervilles

Chapter 17. Thomas Hardy’s – Jude Fawley

Chapter 18. Bram Stoker’s – Dracula

Chapter 19. Joseph Conrad’s – Kurtz

Chapter 20. Rudyard Kipling’s – Kim

Chapter 21. J. M. Barrie’s – Peter Pan

Chapter 22. Edgar Rice Burroughs’s – Tarzan

Chapter 23. John Buchan’s — Richard Hannay

Chapter 24. Virginia Woolf’’s — Clarissa Dalloway

Chapter 25. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s — Jay Gatsby

Chapter 26. Virginia Woolf’s – Orlando

Chapter 27. Leslie Charteris’s – The Saint

Chapter 28. D. H. Lawrence’s – Oliver Mellors

Chapter 29. Aldous Huxley’s – ‘John the Savage’

Chapter 30. Graham Greene’s – Pinkie Brown

Chapter 31. Ernest Hemingway’s — Robert Jordan

Chapter 32. Evelyn Waugh’s – Charles Ryder

Chapter 33. George Orwell’s — Winston Smith

Chapter 34. Malcolm Lowry’s – Geoffrey Firmin

Chapter 35. J. D. Salinger’s – Holden Caulfield

Chapter 36. Ian Fleming’s – James Bond

Chapter 37. J. R. R. Tolkien’s – Aragorn

Chapter 38. Patricia Highsmith’s – Tom Ripley

Chapter 39. P. D. James’s – Adam Dalgliesh

Chapter 40. Doctor Who

Chapter 41. Graham Swift’s – Tom Crick

Chapter 42. Ian Rankin’s – John Rebus

Chapter 43. Michael Ondaatje’s – Almásy

Chapter 44. Martin Amis’s – Samson Young

Chapter 45. Philip Pullman’s — Lyra Silvertongue

Chapter 46. Lara Croft

Chapter 47. Ian McEwan’s — Briony Tallis

Chapter 48. Lee Child’s – Jack Reacher

Chapter 49. Don DeLillo’s – Lauren

Chapter 50. J. K. Rowling’s – Hermione Granger

Chapter 51. Dan Brown’s – Robert Langdon

Chapter 52. Conclusion

Index


For readers who are interested in literary criticism; non-fiction; for academic and general audiences

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