The Sharing (aka Gig) Economy: Overview, Issues and Perspectives

Patricia Dugan (Editor)

Series: Economic Issues, Problems and Perspectives
BISAC: BUS097000

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$150.00

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Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Technological advancement and the proliferation of the smartphone have reshaped the commercial landscape, providing consumers new ways to access the retail marketplace. On-demand companies are one such innovation, and underpinning on-demand commerce is the gig economy, the collection of markets that match service providers to consumers of on-demand services on a gig (or job) basis. Flagship on-demand companies such as Uber (driver services) and Handy (home cleaners and household services) have garnered significant media attention both for their market success and recent legal challenges, particularly concerning the classification of gig workers. Broader questions about the pros and cons of the gig economy have emerged as on-demand markets grow and the gig economy expands into new sectors. By some accounts, workers’ willingness to participate in the gig economy provides evidence that gig work is a beneficial arrangement. Indeed, gig jobs may yield benefits relative to traditional employment in terms of the ease of finding employment and greater flexibility to choose jobs and hours. The gig economy may facilitate bridge employment (e.g., temporary employment between career jobs or between full-time work and retirement) or provide opportunities to generate income when circumstances do not accommodate traditional full-time, full-year employment. At the same time, however, the potential lack of labor protections for gig workers and the precarious nature of gig work have been met with some concern. This book provides an overview of the gig economy and identifies legal and policy questions relevant to its workforce. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1. What Does the Gig Economy Mean for Workers?
Sarah A. Donovan, David H. Bradley and Jon O. Shimabukuro

Chapter 2. Digital Matching Firms: A New Definition in the “Sharing Economy” Space
Rudy Telles, Jr.

Chapter 3. Memorandum to Committee Members for the Hearing on ''The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions''

Chapter 4. Testimony of Dean Baker, Co-Director, Center for Economic and Policy Research. Hearing on ''The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions''

Chapter 5. Testimony of Michael Beckerman, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Internet Association. Hearing on ''The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions''

Chapter 6. Testimony of Alex Chriss, Vice President and General Manager, Intuit, Inc. Hearing on ''The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions''

Chapter 7. Statement of Jonathan Lieber, Chief Economist, Thumbtack. Hearing on ''The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions''

Chapter 8. Testimony of Robert Passmore, Assistant Vice President - Personal Lines, Property Casualty Insurers Association of America. Hearing on ''The Disrupter Series: How the Sharing Economy Creates Jobs, Benefits Consumers, and Raises Policy Questions''

Chapter 9. Memorandum to Committee Members for the Hearing on ''The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I and Part II''

Chapter 10. Testimony of Caroline Bruckner, Managing Director, Kogod Tax Policy Center. Hearing on ''The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I''

Chapter 11. Testimony of Rob Willey, Vice President of Marketing, TaskRabbit. Hearing on ''The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I''

Chapter 12. Testimony of Morgan Reed, Executive Director, ACT The App Association. Hearing on ''The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I'

Chapter 13. Testimony of Joseph Kennedy, Senior Fellow, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. Hearing on ''The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I''

Chapter 14. Statement of Nina E. Olson, National Taxpayer Advocate, Internal Revenue Service. Hearing on ''The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part II''

Chapter 15. Strengthening the Basic Bargain for Workers in the Modern Economy
Senator Elizabeth Warren

Chapter 16. Testimony of Arun Sundararajan, Professor and NEC Fellow, Stern School of Business, New York University. Hearing on ''The Power of Connection: Peer-to-Peer Businesses''

Chapter 17. Testimony of Elizabeth Stevens, Assistant General Counsel, Sidecar Technologies, Inc. Hearing on ''The Power of Connection: Peer-to-Peer Businesses''

Chapter 18. Testimony of Philip Auerswald, Associate Professor of Public Policy, George Mason University. Hearing on ''The Power of Connection: Peer-to-Peer Businesses''

Index

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