The Pope, the Kings and the People. Volume 1

$230.00

William Arthur
W. Blair Neatby (Editor)

Series: Religion and Society
BISAC: REL033000

The Pope, the Kings and the People, by William Arthur traces the history of Vaticanism from 1864 through 1869. The sources of the information contained in this work are, 1. Official documents; 2. Histories having the sanction of the Pope or of bishops; 3. Scholastic works of the present pontificate, and of recognized authority; 4. Periodicals and journals, avowed organs of the Vatican or of its policy, with books and pamphlets by bishops and other Ultramontane writers; 5. The writings of Liberal Catholics.

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Table of Contents

EDITOR’S PREFACE
PREFACE
POSTSCRIPT TO THE PREFACE
LIST OF WORKS QUOTED OR REFERRED TO AS AUTHORITIES

BOOK I. FROM THE ISSUE OF THE SYLLABUS TO ITS SOLEMN CONFIRMATION, DECEMBER 1864 TO JUNE 1867
CHAPTER I. The First Secret Command to commence Preparations for a General Council, December 6, 1864—Meeting of Congregation—All but Cardinals sent out—Secret Order—Events of the 8th—Solemn Anniversary—A historical coup de soleil
CHAPTER II. The Encyclical Quanta Cura, December 8, 1864—Causes of the Ruin of Modern Society: rejection of the “force” of the Church—Religious Equality—Pretensions of Civil Law and of Parents to Control Education—Laws of Mortmain—Remedies—Restoration of the Authority of the Church—Connecting Links between Encyclical and Syllabus—Retrospect of Evidences that all Society was in Ruins—The Movement for Reconstruction
CHAPTER III. Foundation of a Literature of Reconstruction, Serial and Scholastic—The Civiltá Cattolica: its Views on Education and on Church and State—Tarquini’s Political Principles of Pope and King—Measures Preparatory to the Syllabus
CHAPTER IV. Further Measures Preparatory to the Syllabus—Changes in Italy since 1846—Progress of Adverse Events—A Commination of Liberties—A Second Assembly of Bishops without Parliamentary Functions—The Curse on Italy—Origin of the phrase “A Free Church in a Free State”—Projected Universal Monarchy
CHAPTER V. The Syllabus of Errors, December 8, 1864—Character of the Propositions condemned—Disabilities of the State—Powers of the Church
CHAPTER VI. The Secret Memoranda of the Cardinals, February 1865
CHAPTER VII. A Secret Commission to prepare for a Council, March 1865—First Summons—Points determined—Reasons why Princes are not consulted—Plan for the Future Council
CHAPTER VIII. Memoranda of Thirty-six chosen Bishops, consulted under Bond of Strictest Secrecy, April to August, 1865—Doctrine of Church and State—Antagonism of History and the Embryo Dogma—Nuncios admitted to the Secret—And Oriental Bishops
CHAPTER IX. Interruption of Preparations for Fourteen Months, through the consequences of Sadowa—The French evacuate Rome—Alleged Double Dealing of Napoleon III—The Civiltá on St. Bartholomew’s—Change of Plan—Instead of a Council a Great Display—Serious Complaints of Liberal Catholics
CHAPTER X. Reprimand of Darboy, Archbishop of Paris, for disputing the Ordinary and Immediate Jurisdiction of the Pope in his Diocese—Sent in 1864 Published in 1869
CHAPTER XI. Great Gathering in Rome, June 1867—Impressions and Anticipations—Improvements in the City—Louis Veuillot on the Great Future
CHAPTER XII. The Political Lesson of the Gathering, namely, All are called upon to recognize in the Papal States the Model State of the World—Survey of those States
CHAPTER XIII. Solemn Confirmation of the Syllabus by the Pope before the assembled Hierarchy, and their Acquiescence, June 17, 1867

BOOK II. FROM THE FIRST PUBLIC INTIMATION OF A COUNCIL TO THE EVE OF THE OPENING, JUNE 1867 TO DECEMBER 1869
CHAPTER I. First Public Intimation of the intention to hold a Council, June 26 to July 1, 1867—Consistory—Acquiescence in the Syllabus of the assembled Bishops—The Canonized Inquisitor—Questions and Returns preparatory to Greater Centralization—Manning on the Ceremonies—O’Connell on the Doctrines of the Papists—The Doctrine of Direct and Indirect Power
CHAPTER II. Six Secret Commissions preparing—Interrupted by Garibaldi—A Code for the Relations of the Church and Civil Society—Special Sitting with Pope and Antonelli to decide on the Case of Princes—Tales of the Crusaders—English Martyrs—Children on the Altar—Autumn of 1867 to June 1868
CHAPTER III. Bull of Convocation—Doctrine of the Sword—The Crusade of St. Peter—Incidents—Mission to the Orientals, and Overtures to Protestants in different Countries—June 1868 to December 1868-69
CHAPTER IV. Princes, Ministers, and their Confessors—Montalembert’s part in the Revival—His Posthumous Work on Spain—Indignation against the New Assumptions—Debate of Clergy in Paris on the Lawfulness of Absolving a Liberal Prince or Minister—Wrath at Rome—True Doctrines taught to Darboy and his Clergy
CHAPTER V. What is to be the Work of the Council—Fears caused by Grandiose Projects—Reform of the Church in Head and Members—Statesmen evince Concern
CHAPTER VI. Agitation in Bavaria and Germany—The Golden Rose—Fall of Isabella—The King of Bavaria obtains the opinion of the Faculties—Döllinger—Schwarzenberg’s Remonstrance
CHAPTER VII. Intention of proposing the Dogma of Infallibility intimated—Bavarian Note to the Cabinets, February to April, 1869—Arnim and Bismarck
CHAPTER VIII. Indulgences—Excitement—The Two Brothers Dufournel—Senestrey’s Speech—Hopes of the Ruin of Germany—What the Council will do—Absurdity of Constitutional Kings—The True Saviour of Society—Lay Address from Coblenz—Montalembert adheres to it—Religious Liberty does not answer—Importance of keeping Catholic Children apart from the Nation—War on Liberal Catholics—Flags of all Nations doing Homage to that of the Pope
CHAPTER IX. Publication of Janus—Hotter Controversy—Bishop Maret’s Book—Père Hyacinth—The Saviour of Society again—Dress—True Doctrine of Concordats not Contracts but Papal Laws—Every Catholic State has Two Heads—Four National Governments condemned in One Day—What a Free Church means—Fulda Manifesto—Meeting of Catholic Notables in Berlin—Political Agitation in Bavaria and Austria—Stumpf’s Critique of the Jesuit Schemes
CHAPTER X. Conflicting Manifestoes by Bishops—Attacks on Bossuet—Darboy—Dupanloup combats Infallibility—His relations with Dr. Pusey—Deschamps replies—Manning’s Manifesto—Retort of Friedrich—Discordant Episcopal Witnesses
CHAPTER XI. Diplomatic Feeling and Fencing in Rome, November 1869—Cross Policies on Separation of Church and State—Ollivier, Favre, De Banneville—Doctrines of French Statesmen ridiculed at Rome—Specimens of the Utterances approved at Court—Forecasts of War between France and Prussia—Growing Strength of the Movement in France for Universities Canonically Instituted
CHAPTER XII. Mustering, and Preparatory Stimuli—Pope’s Hospitality—Alleged Political Intent—Friedrich’s First Notes—The Nations cited to Judgment—New War of the Rosary—Tarquini’s Doctrine of the Sword—A New Guardian of the Capitol—November and December, 1869
CHAPTER XIII. Great Ceremony of Executive Spectacle, called a Pro-Synodal Congregation, to forestall Attempts at Self-Organization on the Part of the Council—The Scene—The Allocution—Officers appointed by Royal Proclamation—Oath of Secrecy—Papers Distributed—How the Nine had foreseen and forestalled all Questions of Self-Organization—The Assembly made into a Conclave, not a General Council—Cecconi’s Apology for the Rules
CHAPTER XIV. The Eve of the Council—Rejoicings—Rome the Universal Fatherland—Veuillot’s Joy—Processions—Symbolic Sunbeams—The Joy bells—The Vision of St. Ambrose—The Disfranchisement of Kings
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