The Mediterranean Diet: Perspectives, Food Components and Health Effects

Catherine Walton (Editor)

Series: Food and Beverage Consumption and Health
BISAC: HEA048000

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$160.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Non-communicable diseases are currently the leading cause of mortality in the world. It is noteworthy that many cases of these complex diseases can be prevented through the consumption of a healthy diet. The Mediterranean diet (MD) is frequently considered as the dietary ‘elixir’ that is effective in reducing the risk of non-communicable diseases and in improving longevity. In Chapter One, the authors review studies that have revealed interactions between MD and specific genetic variants that effectively reduce the risk of complex diseases. In Chapter Two, the Mediterranean diet in relation to its role in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease is discussed. Chapter Three focuses on the nutrient and phytochemical profile of the Mediterranean diet and its effectiveness in the prevention and management cancer with details on mechanisms of actions. Chapter Four profiles the chemical characteristics and nutritive value of seafood caught in the Ionian Sea that is of high commercial interest in Mediterranean countries. To conclude, Chapter Five discusses the relationship of several different Mediterranean dietary patterns to the incidence of metabolic, cardio-vascular (including stroke), and the most frequent cancers. Beside the expected importance of plant foods and the necessary moderation of animal foods, this comparison unravels the peculiar effect of specific foods, either beneficial foods such as whole grains and olive oil, or detrimental foods such as energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1. The Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet Using Nutrigenetics
Maria G. Kakkoura, Christiana A. Demetriou, Kleitos Sokratous, Maria A. Loizidou, Andreas Hadjisavvas and Kyriacos Kyriacou (Department of Electron Microscopy/Molecular Pathology, The Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia, Cyprus, and others)

Chapter 2. Constituents of the Mediterranean Diet and Their Effects on the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disorders
Marquitta Webb and Sa’eed Bawa (Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Faculty of Food and Agriculture, University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus, The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, and others)

Chapter 3. The Nutrient and Phytochemical Profile of the Mediterranean Diet and Its Effectiveness in the Reduction of Risk for the Development of Cancer
Sa’eed Bawa and Marquitta Webb (Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension, Faculty of Food and Agriculture, University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus, The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, and others)

Chapter 4. Mediterranean Seafood: Functional Food Properties
E. Prato, I. Parlapiano, P. Addis, and F. Biandolino (CNR-IAMC, Institute for Coastal Marine Environment Taranto, Taranto, Italy)

Chapter 5. Adaptation of the Mediterranean Diet to Different Dietary Cultural Settings: What Is Important for Prevention?
Mariette J.Gerber (Former Senior INSERM-Scientist at Cancer Institute Montpellier, France)

Index

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