The Many Benefits of Lactic Acid Bacteria

Jean Guy LeBlanc and Alejandra de Moreno de LeBlanc (Editors)
Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina

Series: Bacteriology Research Developments, Public Health in the 21st Century
BISAC: SCI006000

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are a heterologous group of microorganisms that have been isolated from numerous ecological niches, including fermented foods, plants, and the gastrointestinal tract of animals. Because of their “generally regarded as safe” status (GRAS), there has been great interest in using these microorganisms in food production, as probiotic microorganisms or as biotechnological tools.

This book describes some of the many benefits of LAB including i) their use in foods where advances in the fight against spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in foods, their thermotolerance, their microencapsulation, and responses to osmotic challenges will be discussed; ii) their capacity to produce beneficial compounds including bioactive peptides, biosurfactants, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and antimicrobial products such as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocins, and peptidoglycan hydrolases; and iii) their effect on health and other applications such as their use as a DNA vaccine delivery system, bile-salt hydrolase, and exopolysaccharides production as well as the use of spore forming LAB.

This new book is a compilation of topics that have been written by experts from all over the world (Argentina, Brazil, Greece, Mexico, and Thailand) who work in different research settings offering varying viewpoints on the most up-to-date information currently available on the uses and many benefits of Lactic Acid Bacteria.
(Imprint: Nova)

Chapter 1. Lactic Acid Bacteria against Spoilage and Pathogenic Microorganisms in Food
(Marcela P. Castro, Carmen A. Campo, María E. Cayre, Laura I. Schelegueda, Nadia Galante, and Sofía B. Delcarlo, Laboratorio de Microbiología de Alimentos. Departamento de Ciencias Básicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Nacional del Chaco Austral, Comandante Fernández, Sáenz Peña, Chaco, Argentina, and others)

Chapter 2. Thermotolerant Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria in Cooked Meat Products
(M.L. Pérez-Chabela, Biotechnology Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco, Col. Vicentina, Alcaldía de Iztapalapa, México City, Mexico)

Chapter 3. Microencapsulated Lactic Acid Bacteria in Meat Products
(Daneysa L. Kalschne, Rosana A. Silva-Buzanello, Marinês P. Corso, Eliane Colla, and Cristiane Canan, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, Medianeira, Paraná, Brazil, and others)

Chapter 4. Lactic Acid Bacteria Responses to Osmotic Challenges
(Maria K. Syrokou, Spiros Paramithiotis, and Eleftherios H. Drosinos, Laboratory of Food Quality Control and Hygiene, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece)

Chapter 5. Lactic Acid Bacteria as Source of Biosurfactants
(Carmen A. Campos, Virginia, M. Lara, and María F. Gliemmo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Industrias, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and others)

Chapter 6. Bioactive Peptides Generated by Lactic Acid Bacteria
(Marcela P. Castro, Noelia Z. Palavecino Prpich, and María E. Cayré, Laboratorio de Microbiología de Alimentos, Departamento de Ciencias Básicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Nacional del Chaco Austral, Comandante Fernández, Sáenz Peña, Chaco, Argentina, and others)

Chapter 7. Antimicrobial Bacteriocins and Peptidoglycan Hydrolases: Beneficial Metabolites Produced by Lactic Acid Bacteria
(Adriana López-Arvizu, Israel García-Cano, María de Lourdes Pérez-Chabela, and Edith Ponce-Alquicira, Departamento de Biotecnología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, CDMX, Mexico, and others)

Chapter 8. Antimicrobial Products: An Important Feature of Lab and Their Applications
(Sujitra Techo, and Somboon Tanasupawat, Mahidol University, Nakhonsawan Campus, Nakhonsawan, Thailand, and others)

Chapter 9. Diversity and Production of γ-Aminobutyric Acid by Lactic Acid Bacteria
(Sukanya Phuengjayaem, and Somboon Tanasupawat, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand)

Chapter 10. Lactococcus Lactis as a DNA Vaccine Delivery System
(Vanessa Bastos Pereira, Tatiane Melo Preisser, Camila Prósperi De Castro, Bianca Mendes Souza, Meritxell Zurita Turk, Vanessa Pecini da Cunha, and Anderson Miyoshi, Laboratório de Tecnologia Genética, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil)

Chapter 11. Bile Salt Hydrolase Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria: A Potential for Health
(Engkarat Kingkaew, and Somboon Tanasupawat, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand)

Chapter 12. Exopolysaccharides from Lactobacillus: Biosynthesis, Characterization, Functional Aspects and Applications in Food Industry
(Elisa C. Ale, Jorge A. Reinheimer, and Ana G. Binetti, Instituto de Lactología Industrial, Santiago del Estero, Santa Fe, Argentina)

Chapter 13. Spore-Forming Lactic Acid Bacteria and Their Abilities for Utilization
(Sitanan Thitiprasert, Nuttha Thongchul, and Somboon Tanasupawat, Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, and others)

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