The Future of Online Education

$230.00

Stephen Paul McKenzie, PhD – School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia
Lilani Arulkadacham, PhD –  School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Australia
Jennifer Chung, PhD – School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Australia
Zahra Aziz, PhD – School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Australia

Series: Advancements in Learning and Instruction
BISAC: EDU041000; EDU015000; EDU029000
DOI: https://doi.org/10.52305/LERQ4827

The Future of Online Education provides a vision of a fully successful online education future and practical ways to best turn this vision into a reality, and benefit from it, for online education decision makers, designers, educators and students. The book provides emerging online education knowledge, perspectives, issues and opportunities, and integrates these with practical ways for online education providers and recipients to fully benefit from their great new opportunities. The book is a valuable guide to achieving the best possible online education future and will comprehensively support online education development and implementation across courses and institutions. The Future of Online Education also provides a unique coming together of online education expert perspectives, ideas, examples and resources that will inform, inspire and support a whole-hearted entering into and advancing of our emerging online education world.

Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Introduction and Overview
Stephen McKenzie1, PhD, Lilani Arulkadacham2, PhD, Jennifer Chung2, PhD, and Zahra Aziz2, PhD
1
School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia
2School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 2. The Future of Online Education: Transforming Great Challenges into Great Opportunities
Stephen McKenzie1, PhD and Filia Garivaldis2, PhD
1
School of Psychological Science, University of Melbourne, Australia
2BehaviourWorks Australia, Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 3. Is Online Education Mutating into Something it Shouldn’t?
Christopher J. Holt, PhD
Australian College of Applied Professions, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 4. Expanding Online Education Frontiers – Needs, Opportunities and Examples
Stephen McKenzie1, PhD, Margaret Osborne1,2, Carol Johnson2, Grace Nixon3, Kelley Graydon3, Dani Tomlin3, Sarah Van Dam4 and Michelle I. Jongenelis1
1
School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia
2Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne, Australia
3Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Melbourne, Australia
4SEC Newgate Research, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 5. Breaking New Grounds beyond Tertiary Education: Adapting Professional Development and Training for Online Delivery
Zahra Aziz1, Isobel Bandurek2 and Morven Roberts2
1
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
2Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases, London, United Kingdom

Chapter 6. Academic Governance and Online Pedagogy
Judith Gullifer1, PhD, and John Russo2
1
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton Australia
2Catholic Regional College, North Keilor, Victoria, Australia

Chapter 7. Optimizing the University Experience Through Digital Skills Training: Beyond Digital Nativity
Eleanor J. Dommett
Department of Psychology, King’s College London, London, UK

Chapter 8. The Role of Theory in Indigenous Health Online Learning Pedagogy
Karen Adams1, Mandy Truong2 and Colleen Kelly3
1
Gukwonderuk Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
2Monash Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
3Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia

Chapter 9. The Future of Online Education Includes Equity, Human Rights and Wellbeing
Ebba Ossiannilsson
International Council for Open and Distance Education, International Council on Badges and Credentials and Swedish Association for Open, Flexible and Distance Education, Lund, Sweden

Chapter 10. From Workplace to Classroom and Back Again: Integrating Online Collaboration Tools in Higher Education
Nikolai Alksnis1 and Yogita Ahuja1,2
1
Faculty of Engineering, Monash University Clayton, Melbourne, Australia
2School of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University Clayton, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 11. Redesigning for Student Agency in University Learning. A Flipped Approach for Teaching Successfully Online
Edwin Creely1 and Danah Henriksen2
1
Faculty of Education, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
2Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University, Phoenix, USA

Chapter 12. Supervising Research Students in an Online Mode
Zahra Aziz, Lilani Arulkadacham and Jennifer Chung, PhD
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 13. Exploring Approaches to Professional Development for Online Teaching in Higher Education: A Case Study of the Graduate Diploma in Psychology
Leah Braganza, Eloise Perini, Dragan Ilic and Matthew E. Mundy
Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 14. Supporting Neurodiversity in Online Education: A Systematic Review
Anne-Laure Le Cunff, Eleanor Dommett and Vincent Giampietro
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

Chapter 15. Delivering Equitable, Diverse and Inclusive Experiential Learning Online During COVID-19
Dr. Leela Cejnar1 and Dr. Melanie Aley
1
Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, United Kingdom
2Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, Australia

Chapter 16. Virtually Alone: How to Address Wellbeing in Online Courses Teaching Sensitive and Triggering Learning Content
Lilani Arulkadacham
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 17. Recommendations for Student Success and Student Wellbeing in Modern Higher Education
Jennifer Chung1, PhD, Stephen McKenzie2, PhD and Matthew E. Mundy3
1
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
2School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Australia
3Monash Centre for Professional Development and Monash Online Education, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 18. Addressing the Elephant in the Room: Teaching Real Life Skills in the Online Format
Ashleigh Schweinsberg
School of Psychological Sciences, Psychology Education Lab, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 19. Two Possible Futures of Online Learning
Punya Mishra1, Melissa Warr2 and Benjamin Scragg3
1
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University, Tempe Arizona, United States
2School of Education, University of Louisiana-Monroe, Monroe, Louisiana, United States
3eFuse, Chicago, Illinois, United States

Chapter 20. Creating Engaging Curriculum Using Innovative Technology in Education
Azra Ladha
Calgary Campus, University of Lethbridge, Calgary, Canada

Chapter 21. Expanding Education through Virtual Reality
Cyan DeVeaux, Eugy Han and Jeremy N. Bailenson
Communication, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA

Chapter 22. “Hello, my Name is Differ!” The Use of Chatbots for Providing Collaborative Study Support to University Students
Sylvie Studente
Regent’s University, London, United Kingdom

Chapter 23. Learning Global Health: An Online Collaborative Multicultural Learning Experience
Gulzar Malik and Jacqueline Johnston
School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 24. Distance Simulation in Health Professions Education: Moving Beyond Adaptation
Debra Nestel1, 2, AM PhD FAcad Med FSSH, Samantha Syms3, 4, Filia Garivaldis5, PhD, FHEA,
and Ram Nataraja6, 7, MBBS BSc(Hons) GCCS(Hons) MSurgEd FRCSEd (Paed.Surg) FFSTEd FRACS (Paeds)
1School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Australia
2Department of Surgery (Austin), University of Melbourne, Australia
3Gordon Center for Simulation and Innovation in Medical Education, Miami, Florida, USA
4University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, USA
5BehaviourWorks Australia, Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Monash University, Australia
6Monash Children’s Simulation, Monash Children’s Hospital, Melbourne Australia
7Departments of Paediatrics and Surgery, School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Australia

Chapter 25. Conclusion – What Now?
Lilani Arulkadacham1, PhD, Stephen McKenzie2, PhD, Jennifer Chung1 , PhD and Zahra Aziz1, PhD
1School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
2School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia

Index