The Contrarian Instructor: Leading College Students to Ask and Answer Their Own Questions

$89.00$160.00

John Wm. Folkins, Ph.D.
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Emeritus, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, USA

Series: Education in a Competitive and Globalizing World
BISAC: EDU029000

Are your students motivated and able to learn as much as you would like them to? Do they readily apply what they have learned? Do they even remember much of this learned content the next semester? Do they ask meaningful questions or are they mostly concerned with asking what will be on the next examination?

This book discusses findings from psychology, education, and other disciplines showing that there are ways instructors can design curricula, classes, and learning experiences to improve the students’ ability and desire to probe for new insights, and to apply them to their own agendas. Although this book reviews many approaches for providing students with the motivation and guidance to learn, it is not a manual of specific classroom techniques. Rather, the book will inspire and equip instructors to ask their own questions about how their classes could better inspire and equip their students to ask and answer their own questions in principled ways.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Chapter 1. The Contrarian Approach to College Student Learning

Chapter 2. The Purpose of a College Education

Chapter 3. A Student’s Purpose Determines a Student’s Approach to Learning

Chapter 4. The Reflective Practice Approach to Deep Learning

Chapter 5. Critical Thinking to Foster Reflective Practice and Deep Learning

Chapter 6. Critical Thinking about Critical Thinking

Chapter 7. Critical Thinking about Deep Learning

Chapter 8. Using Video Games as a Guide to Inspire Deep Learning

Chapter 9. Reflective Practice in Class

Chapter 10. Reflective Practice without the Class

Chapter 11. Style Matters

Chapter 12. Space Matters

Chapter 13. Learning Leadership in Every Course

Chapter 14. Conclusion: Asking the Right Questions

References

Acknowledgments

About the Author

Index


Reviews

“I was delighted to read John Folkins’ book, The Contrarian Instructor: Leading College Students to Ask and Answer Their Own Questions. He has addressed so directly and cogently many of the beliefs and practices of university teaching that have plagued many of us for years. The best part is that Dr. Folkins gives suggestions for change in the way we can organize classes and encourage student engagement and learning. The book is beautifully organized, easy to read, and offers a way of teaching and learning that everyone in a university setting should embrace. As a former director of our university’s Center for Teaching and Research Excellence, I would have been thrilled to have been able to share Dr. Folkins’ wonderful book with the university faculty members and doctoral students who needed help with their teaching assignments. Now I can recommend an incredible resource to all.” –  Rosalind R. Scudder, Professor Emeritus, Wichita State University, Kansas, USA

“We live in a world where sometimes objective observations are less influential than appeals to emotion or personal belief. John Folkins provides a contrarian’s guide to counter such a world. Based on his experience and wisdom developed over his long career as educator, researcher, and academic leader, he provides us with a thoughtful set of guidelines to help instructors understand how they can help our future helping professionals to learn that it’s not just what they think that matters, but how they think.” – Patrick Finn, Professor, University of Georgia, Georgia, USA

<a href=”https://novapublishers.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Book-Review-The-Contrarian-Instructor-Leading-College-Students-to-Ask-and-Answer-Their-own-Questions-Brown.pdf” target=”_blank”>Click here</a> to read the book review by – M. Neil Browne, Distinguished Teaching Professor of Economics and Law Emeritus, Bowling Green State University, Ohio, USA

“I was delighted to read John Folkins’ book, The Contrarian Instructor: Leading College Students to Ask and Answer Their Own Questions. He has addressed so directly and cogently many of the beliefs and practices of university teaching that have plagued many of us for years. The best part is that Dr. Folkins gives suggestions for change in the way we can organize classes and encourage student engagement and learning. The book is beautifully organized, easy to read, and offers a way of teaching and learning that everyone in a university setting should embrace. As a former director of our university’s Center for Teaching and Research Excellence, I would have been thrilled to have been able to share Dr. Folkins’ wonderful book with the university faculty members and doctoral students who needed help with their teaching assignments. Now I can recommend an incredible resource to all.” – Rosalind R. Scudder, Professor Emeritus, Wichita State University, Kansas, USA

“We live in a world where sometimes objective observations are less influential than appeals to emotion or personal belief. John Folkins provides a contrarian’s guide to counter such a world. Based on his experience and wisdom developed over his long career as educator, researcher, and academic leader, he provides us with a thoughtful set of guidelines to help instructors understand how they can help our future helping professionals to learn that it’s not just what they think that matters, but how they think.” – Patrick Finn, Professor, University of Georgia, Georgia, USA

<a href=”http://scalar.usc.edu/works/c2c-digital-magazine-spring–summer-2018/book-review–bridging-the-global-digital-divide-through-human-connections-training-and-techno” target=”_blank”><FONT COLOR=BLUE><U>C2C Digital Magazine</U></FONT>  –  Shalin Hai-Jew, Instructional Designer, Kansas State University, USA


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The primary audience is those people who are teaching college classes or plan to teach them in the future, such as graduate teaching assistants. This book should be of interest to those in all scholarly disciplines at all types of institutions. I fully expect that the first instructors to purchase this book will be those already practicing student-centered instruction and/or innovative teaching in general. But then these instructors will share it with instructors who are committed to traditional approaches. I can see the innovative instructors giving copies of the book away to colleagues as holiday presents. It will produce converts.

Secondary audiences include college administrators and others interested in college teaching even if they are not personally engaged in it. The book should be readable for those without significant scholarly background. It should have global significance as the issues relate to teaching in all cultures. This book is not designed as the textbook for a course, but if one were to teach a graduate course on college pedagogy, it would be an ideal textbook.

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