The Analogy of Religion to the Constitution and Course of Nature

$230.00

Joseph Butler (Author)

Series: Religion and Society
BISAC: REL070000

In this book, Joseph Butler examines Christianity. He discusses its importance, its proofs, the unavoidableness of its containing strange things, the absurdity of expecting fully to comprehend its statements. He answers not only the objections to Christianity, but the objections against its proofs; which he shows are very different things.

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Table of Contents

Editor’s Introduction
Preface
Conspectus
Introduction
PART I. OF NATURAL RELIGION.
Chap. I.—A Future Life
Chap. II.—The Government of God by Rewards and Punishments
Chap. III.—The Moral Government of God
Chap. IV.—Probation, as implying Trial, Difficulties, and Danger
Chap. V.—Probation, as intended for Moral Discipline and Improvement
Chap. VI.—The Opinion of Necessity, considered as influencing Practice
Chap. VII.—The Government of God, considered as a Scheme or Constitution, imperfectly comprehended
Conclusion

PART II. OF REVEALED RELIGION.
Chap. I.—The Importance of Christianity
Chap. II.—The supposed Presumption against a Revelation, considered as miraculous
Chap. III.—Our Incapacity of judging, what were to be expected in a Revelation; and the Credibility, from Analogy, that it must contain things appearing liable to Objections
Chap. IV.—Christianity, considered as a Scheme or Constitution, imperfectly comprehended
Chap. V.—The Particular System of Christianity; the Appointment of a Mediator, and the Redemption of the World by him
Chap. VI.—Want of Universality in Revelation; and of the supposed Deficiency in the Proof of it
Chap. VII.—The Particular Evidence for Christianity
Chap. VIII.—Objections against arguing from the Analogy of Nature to Religion
Conclusion

DISSERTATIONS.
Dissertation I.—Personal Identity
Dissertation II.—The Nature of Virtue
Index

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