Temporal Love: Temporality and Romantic Relationships

Mira Moshe, PhD
Ariel University Center of Samaria Shoham, Israel

Series: Social Issues, Justice and Status, Psychology of Emotions, Motivations and Actions
BISAC: FAM029000

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Temporal Love: Temporality and Romantic Relationships deals with personal, social and cultural time perceptions and their impact on love and romantic relationships. By focusing on time orientation and its representation in romantic relationships, this book reveals the latent links between temporality and love. Given that the Western conception of time is based on the ability to distinguish and compare among time units and time intervals, fascinating layers of covert romantic ties are revealed: the representation of temporality in marriage and non-marital relationships as well as in long-term “no strings attached” ones; the blurred boundaries between expectations based on past relationships, present love and future intimacy; the real world of “here and now” vs. virtual intimacy and sexuality in the cyber age; the interjecting of “there-and-then” into “here-and-now”; the need to cope with “ghosts from the past”; the reverberation of dating time back and forth coupling intimacy rituals; nostalgic “there-and-then”; romantic secrets; deception and betrayal, and more.

Temporal Love: Temporality and Romantic Relationships draws a comparison between “natural,” warm spontaneity free of external romantic intervention with “mechanical” cold, pre-scheduled and monitored love and intimacy. Spontaneous temporal behavior is depicted as authentic and fatalistic behavior, whereas planned ahead of time is portrayed as rational and alienated. Furthermore, there is an analysis of “time trading,” i.e., investing in romance and maintaining long-term romantic relationships via investing “time coins” in hopes of future profit. Among other things, taking a break from one’s lover, breaking up or getting a divorce are represented as a kind of “financial” write-off, whereas a sense of permanency in a relationship might be viewed as a successful time investment. Simultaneously, the “time trading” phenomenon generates a tendency to raise the stakes in the relationship and boost the willingness to “work” at it and make a commitment.

Finally, Temporal Love: Temporality and Romantic Relationships attempts to illuminate efforts to minimize “temporal damage” and maximize “temporal gains,” while raising personal, social and cultural expectations for a “happily ever after” and “till death do us part” romantic experience. (Imprint: Novinka)

Preface

Chapter 1. Temporal Orientation and Romantic Relationships

Chapter 2. Romantic Relationships and Love in the "Here-and-Now"

Chapter 3. Romantic Relationships and Love "There-and-Then"

Chapter 4. Taking a Break - Romantic Relationships, Love and the Notion of Time-Out

Chapter 5. Time Horizons: Happiness and Well-Being

Index

“Temporal Love" takes a fascinating new approach to the study of romantic love. In a comprehensive series of articles, the book sets out to decode the meaning of romantic love through the study of our engagement with time. In Moshe's view, temporal perspectives and orientations constitute the essence of the interpersonal relationships between partners. Her thesis thus widens our understanding of this volatile and complex of human emotions, by insisting on the ways in which time - an omnipotent cultural construct - rules our imagination, shapes our memories and fortifies our sense of belonging, and passion. The book will be of great interest to anyone concerned with the intertwining of culture, society, and persons.” - Shirly Bar-Lev, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, School of Engineering, Ruppin Academic Center, Emek Hefer, Israel

Click here to read the book review by - Matan Aharoni, Ph.D, Sammy Ofer School of Communications, the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzelia, Israel

Click here to read the book review by - Nicoleta Corbu, PhD, Professor, Executive Director, Center for Research in Communication; College of Communication and Public Relations; National University of Political Studies and Public Administration; Bucharest, Romania

Click here to read the book review by - Raluca Buturoiu, Assistant Lecturer, PhD, College of Communication and Public Relations, National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania

Chapter 1

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Chapter 2

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Chapter 3

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Chapter 4

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Chapter 5

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