Strategies to Reduce and Preserve Power Distribution Networks by Using New Technologies and Renewable Energy for Remote Areas

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Alan R. Howgrave-Graham and Barbara C. Panther
Monash University, Victoria, Australia

Series: Energy Science, Engineering and Technology
BISAC: TEC000000

Energy is only really valuable at its point of use and it therefore makes sense that the closer the point of generation is to the point of consumption, the less infrastructure is required for its distribution. This is less of a problem in largely populated areas where economies of scale make infrastructure installation more viable, or where distribution lines are only required to be relatively short due to settlements being close to each other. However, vast unpopulated countries such as Australia or even sparsely populated tracts of land such as in the world’s deserts require a less capital and resource intensive solution to ensure the populations’ access to power. This book discusses the choices that can be made for energy distribution and small-scale energy generation depending upon which is cheaper, cleaner, and more efficient and suggest ways of implementing these to make best use of the prevailing circumstances and environment. (Imprint: Nova)

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Table of Contents

PREFACE

INTRODUCTION

CLEAN ENERGY GLOBALLY

CLEAN ENERGY IN AUSTRALIA

CLEAN ENERGY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF ENERGY

MAKING ENERGY CLEANER

CLEANING UP DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSMISSION INFRASTRUCTURE

DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE REGIONS

SELECTING STRATEGIES FOR POWER GENERATION, TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION

CONCLUSION

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

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