Spelling Skills: Acquisition, Abilities, and Reading Connection

$95.00

Blake C. Fabini (Editor)

Series: Education in a Competitive and Globalizing World

Unlike oral communication, reading is not an automatic or naturally acquired skill, and children do not learn to read in the same manner as they learn to speak. Reading requires that children be able to process letter sounds visually. There is a definite connection between reading and spelling, but the skills needed for spelling are more complex than the skills needed for reading or oral communication. Spelling goes a step further and requires that children be able to process phonetic sounds and apply them to letter symbols in order to form visual-phonological connections that can be reconstructed in oral and/or written form. This book presents and discusses topical data on spelling skills.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1: Effects of Morphological Training on Individuals with Difficulties in Spelling Acquisition: Evidence from Greece (pp. 1-50)
(Styliani N. Tsesmeli, Dimitrios Douvalis, Konstantinos Kyrou, Department of Education, University of Aegean, Rhodes, Greece, and others)

Chapter 2: Influences of Word Frequency, Context, and Age on Spelling (pp. 51-76)
(Lise Abrams, Katherine K. White, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, and others)

Chapter 3: What Can Learning to Spell Contribute to Learning to Read? (pp. 77-92)
(Nicole J. Conrad, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada)

Chapter 4: Spelling Transparency and its Impact on Short-Term Memory: Evidence from Persian and English (pp. 93-106)
(Bahman Baluch, Sajida Choudhury, Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom)

Chapter 5: Commentary: Spelling: The Path Not Chosen – The Reading and Writing Connection (pp. 107-111)
(Elaine Clanton Harpine, University of South Carolina, Aiken, South Carolina)

Index

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Binding

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