Sociolinguistics and Dialectological Studies in Indonesia

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Sonya Puspasari Suganda (Editor) – Lecturer, Head of Post Graduate Linguistics Program, Linguistics Department, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia
Antonia Soriente (Editor) – Lecturer, Department of Asian, African and Mediterranean Studies, Universtiy of Naples ‘L’Orientale,’ Italy

Series: Languages and Linguistics

BISAC: LAN009050

Target Audience: The principal audience for this edited volume is undergraduate and postgraduate students and also experienced researchers who are looking for current research on sociolinguistics and dialectology in Indonesia. Students, scholars and language practitioners from the field of Linguistics, Cultural Studies, Sociology and even Anthropology will discover many unique findings on the social and cultural aspects of language particularly in Indonesia which is very diverse in terms of its linguistics landscape.

Description:
This book contains chapters which are classified into three major themes, namely Dialectology Studies in Indonesia, Sociolinguistics Issues in Java, and Meanings and Society. The first part of the edited volume discusses the close relationship between culture, traditions, and myths in the community, such as the tradition of Labuhan in East Java as a ritual offering to the Queen of the Southern Sea. There are multiple factors influencing languages in different regions in Indonesia, which include economic development from the tourism sector. The second part focuses on the concept of the relationship between language and its speakers. Family, as the smallest unit of society, is considered the most ideal place for language maintenance. Country is also assumed to play an important role in determining what language to maintain through lessons taught in school. The interesting thing, however, is that in the Indonesian context, administrative boundary is not always equivalent with the language boundary. Expansion or unification of regions, for instance, may change the language curriculum taught in schools. Meanwhile, Meanings and Society chapters show that the intention to maintain tradition and establish harmonious relations with other speakers from different backgrounds may also influence the way someone speaks. It is not surprising, therefore, that code switching in a conversation, which is done with the intention to show solidarity towards speakers from different backgrounds, has become a common phenomenon in Indonesia. The studies in this book constitute empirical studies of the Indonesian people’s everyday lives particularly those concerning the abundance of languages spoken across the country.

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Preface

Chapter 1. A Dialectology Study of Archaic Javanese Vocabulary along the Southern Coast of East Java
(Dinda Fitria Sabila and Sri Munawarah – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 2. The Impact of Tourism on the Banyuwangi Dialect in East Java
(Satwiko Budiono, Multamia R. M. T. Lauder and Sri Munawarah – Language Center for Development and Preservatioan, National Agency for Language Development and Cultivation, Jakarta, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 3. Investigation of Yogyakarta Dialect’s Vocabulary in Areas of Banyumas’ Ngapak Dialect
(Ratih Rahayu and Sri Munawarah – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 4. Phonological Variation in the Minangkabau Language Used in the City of Padang
(Amalia Husna Jaya and Multamia R. M. T. Lauder – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 5. Linguistic Evidence in Question of Language and Dialect for the Badui Tribe
(Davin Rusady and Sri Munawarah – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 6. The Use of the Javanese-Tegal Dialect by Tegalese Migrants in Jakar-Ta and Depok
(Satyawati and Mohammad Umar Muslim – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 7. Hokkien Influence on the Language Variant Spoken in Tangerang
(Irmala Sukendra – Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Language, Atmajaya University, Jakarta Indonesia)

Chapter 8. Family as a Crucial Factor in Language Maintenance: A Case Study of Banten Javanese
(Siti Suharsih, Afdol Tharik Wastono and Sonya Puspasari Suganda – Linguistics Department, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia)

Chapter 9. Family as a Supporting Factor for Language Maintenance in Indonesian Young Adults from Leuwinanggung Village
(Tia Isni Setianingsih and Totok Suhardijanto – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 10. The Problematic Implementation of Javanese Language Local Content: A Case Study of Language Policy in Serang Municipality
(Hudzaifah and Multamia R. M. T. Lauder – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 11. An Analysis of Code-Switching in an Indonesian Talk Show: Sule and Andre as the Hosts
(Sari Kusuma Dewi and Bernadette Kushartanti – Indonesian Study Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 12. A Toponymic Study of the Meanings of Village Names in Cilacap, Central Java
(Amalina Shomami and Multamia R. M. T. Lauder – Politeknik Negeri Jakarta, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 13. “Hot” in the Life of Javanese Society: Lexica, Meanings, and Relations
(Widya Kusumaningrum and Widhyasmaramurti – Javanese Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Chapter 14. Semantic Fields of the Indonesian Emotive Words Senang, Bahagia, and Gembira
(Nadia Mahardika Putri, Dien Rovita and Totok Suhardijanto – Indonesian Studies Program, Faculty of Humanities, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia, et al.)

Index

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