Salicylic Acid Contribution in Plant Biology against a Changing Environment

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Dhriti Kapoor, PhD (Editor) – Assistant Professor, Department of Botany, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, India
Vandana Gautam, PhD (Editor) – Assistant Professor, Dr. Yashwant Singh Parmar University of Horticulture & Forestry, Nauni, India
Renu Bhardwaj (Editor) – Professor (Director Research), Department of Botanical & Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Punjab India

Series: Plant Science Research and Practices

BISAC: SCI011000

Salicylic acid (SA) chemically known as 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a ubiquitous endogenous plant growth regulator of phenolic nature, synthesized by plants which acts as a vital endogenous signaling molecule in plant immune response. SA is recognized as a multifaceted element that have crucial roles in various plant physiological processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, photosynthetic activity, nutrient absorption and transport, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, thermogenesis, stomatal closure, flowering, expression of senescence-related genes, inducing antioxidant defense system and resistance to a broad spectrum of pathogens. SA mode of action varies with plant species, plant developmental phase, its mode of application, and its endogenous level in the plant. SA have high metabolic and physiological activity therefore, involved in the activation of plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stress factors and also involved in the transcriptional reprograming and in controlling transcription and expression of several defense related genes. SA in minor quantities provide plant stress tolerance, but high amounts of SA triggers oxidative stress due to generation of plethora of ROS which ultimately lead to cell death. Under stress conditions, SA interplays with reactive oxygen species (ROS) as crucial signaling molecules for inducing genetically controlled defense-related mechanisms and expression of genes that cause defense against stress. Keeping these points in mind, various aspects like significance of SA for plants, its stress mitigation properties as well as cross-talk with other plant growth regulators have been mentioned.

The book has seven chapters which deal with the role of phytohormone salicylic acid in plants, its mechanism of synthesis, signaling & homeostasis in plants, its crosstalk with ROS in mitigation of stress and its interaction with other plant growth regulators.

This book comprises a wealth of knowledge to botanists, agriculturists, students and researchers of colleges and universities.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Mechanism of Salicylic Acid Synthesis and Homeostasis in Plants
(Deepka Sharma, Karuna Dhiman, Sadaf Jan,Indu Sharma,Vandana Gautam and Reena Kumari – Department of Biotechnology, College of Horticulture and Forestry (Dr. Y. S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan (HP), Neri Campus, Himachal Pradesh, India, et al.)

Chapter 2. Salicylic Acid and ROS Crosstalk in Plants for Pathogen Resistance
(Sadaf Jan, Parvaiz Ahmad, Renu Bhardwaj, Reena Kumari, Rattandeep Singh, Kamal Sharma and Vandana Gautam -Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan (HP), Neri Campus, Himachal Pradesh, India, et al.)

Chapter 3. Salicylic Acid Induced Metabolites Regulation in Plants
(Mamta Pujari, Sanjeev Kumar, Savita Bhardwaj and Dhriti Kapoor -Department of Botany, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Delhi-Jalandhar Highway, Phagwara (Punjab), India, et al.)

Chapter 4. Salicylic Acid Signaling and ROS Balance in Plants
(Savita Bhardwaj, Deepika Sharmaand Dhriti Kapoor – Department of Botany, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara (Punjab), India, et al.)

Chapter 5. Implications of Salicylic Acid in Symbiotic Relationship in Plants
(Arun Dev Singh, Kanika Khanna, Pardeep Kumar, Jaspreet Kour, Shalini Dhiman, Tamanna Bhardwaj, Amandeep Rattan and Renu Bhardwaj – Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar (Punjab), India)

Chapter 6. Crosstalk of Salicylic Acid with Other Plant Growth Regulators Inducing Stress Tolerance
(Dhriti Sharma, Karuna Dhiman and Mamta Pujari – Department of Biotechnology, Department of Biotechnology, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Dr. Y. S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan (HP), Neri Campus, Himachal Pradesh, India, et al.)

Chapter 7. Biotechnological Role of Salicylic Acid: A Plant Hormone
(Varsha Rani and Madan L. Verma – Department of Biotechnology, School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Information Technology Una, Himachal Pradesh, India, et al.)

Index

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