Reflections on Professionalism, Pedagogy and the Theoretical Underpinnings of Teaching Practice Revisited

Elias Rajabalala Mathipa, T. Netshitangani and S. M. Matlabe (Editors)
University of South Africa, College of Education, Pretoria, South Africa

Series: Professions – Training, Education and Demographics
BISAC: EDU029000

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In this book, the different authors attempt to deal with some of the issues raised by plucking the gaps and addressing the paucity of critical engagement by vigorously reflecting in a robust manner the burning issues that bedevil teaching practices. The chapters of this book address various topics concerning teaching practices with the goal of placing before the reader a variety of the authors’ experiences, perceptions and insights into teaching and learning in general.

Teaching practices is an important bedrock component in initial teacher training programmes designed deliberately to capacitate future teachers with the requisite skills of teaching the learner with passion and commitment. Children as constituting the bulk of learners, are the future hope of a nation, and they need teachers who are skilsful, competent, compassionate and understand how/what it is to be a child. This book offers a variety of views, theories, beliefs, policies, experiences and suggestions that together strive to make a significant contribution to teaching practices.

Among others, the authors argue that it is incumbent for universities to continuously evaluate their teaching practice programmes and models so as to keep abreast with new developments, and to also search for new ways and approaches that could improve teaching practices. It is imperative for teachers to remain active in the pursuit of scientific enquiry as a means of discovering and/or inventing new theories and methods of improving their teaching practices, so that the learners could benefit maximally.

Furthermore, the various authors exchange ideas and also emphasize the necessity of first assessing the needs of a situation before venturing to a solution. Without being aware of the needs of their student teachers and the learners they teach, the lecturers may not be able to meet the demands of the teaching practice. (Imprint: Nova)

Foreword

Introduction and Orientation Perspective

Chapter 1. Practicing Teachers’ Perceptions of Teacher Trainees: Implications for Teacher Education
Alice Merab Kagoda and John Sentongo (Professor of Education, Department of Humanities and Language Education, and Department of Science, Technical and Vocational Education, School of Education, Makerere University, Uganda)

Chapter 2. Challenges of Delivering Quality Teaching Practice Services to Students
H.H. Chikuya (Zimbabwe Council for Higher Education, Zimbabwe)

Chapter 3. Professional Growth and Development of the Teacher: An Imperative of the Education Profession
S.M. Matlabe and E.R. Mathipa (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 4. The Role of Ethics in Building the Professional Character of the Teacher
E.R. Mathipa, D.M. Mampuru and S.S. Mukhari (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 5. Voices of Teachers on the Teaching of Reading Skills to Learners with Reading Problems at Foundation Phase: A Case Study of Five Primary Schools
N.P. Mudzielwana (University of Venda, Thohoyandou, South Africa)

Chapter 6. ICT Opportunities and Threats in Implementing Teaching Practice Programmes
B. Madlela (Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Port Elizabeth, South Africa)

Chapter 7. Quality Assurance of Teaching Practice Materials at Unisa
Q.K. Semuli, Dr. V. Nkonyane and Prof E.R. Mathipa (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 8. Voices from Zimbabwe on why Men Avoid Literacy Programme
E. R. Mathipa, Q.K Semuli and Dr. D. Midzi (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 9. The Reaction of Supervisors Towards an Introduction of Tablet Devices During Teaching Practice Supervision
B. Matsoso (Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa)

Chapter 10. A Reflection on High School Learners’ Need for Education for Democracy: A South African Situation
E.R. Mathipa, L. Higgs and T.J. Tlhapi (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 11. Historico-Comparative Description of how Teachers in the Racially Segregated Apartheid South Africa Were Trained
E.R. Mathipa (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 12. Teacher Factors Influencing the use of ICT in Teaching and Learning in South African Urban Schools
S.S. Mukhari and E.R. Mathipa (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 13. Preparation of Mathematics Teachers: Pedagogical Issues
Z.M.M. Jojo (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 14. Teacher Practices that Promote School Violence
Tshilidzi Netshitangani (University of South Africa, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa)

Chapter 15. Critical Thinking as an Important Skill: A Case Study of ODL Students on Teaching Practice
Christopher Rwodzi (Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa)

Chapter 16. In Search of Learning for Perspective Transformation in Teacher Education: A Case for Teaching Practice
M.R.M. Molefe (Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa)

Chapter 17. Ensuring Quality Teaching Practice in Higher Education Institutions
S.T. Mampane (University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa)

Chapter 18. Students’ Self-Assessment of their Performance in Relation to a Teaching Practice Assessment Instrument
L.M.P. Mulaudzi (University of Venda, Thohoyandou, South Africa)

Chapter 19. The Language Teachers’ Concept of Assessment: Ensuring Alignment of Teaching, Learning and Assessment
P.M. Sebate (University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa)

Chapter 20. Pre-Service Teachers’ Mathematics Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Assessing Learners’ Operation of Numbers using a Number Line
M.M. Phoshoko (University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa)

About the Editors

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