PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) for Plant Stress Management

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Indu Sharma, MSc, PhD – Associate Professor, Department of Life Sciences, Sant Baba Bhag Singh University, Jalandhar, India (ORCID: 0000-0003-0302-9370)
Ashutosh Sharma, MSc, MPhil, PhD, PGDAEM – Associate Professor, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, DAV University, Jalandhar, India (ORCID: 0000-0003-3101-0116)
Renu Bhardwaj, MSc, MPhil, PhD (Biology) – Director Research & Professor, Department of Botanical & Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India (ORCID: 0000-0001-7523-5654)
Geetika Sirhindi, MSc, PhD – Professor, Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala, India (ORCID:  0000-0001-9740-923X)

Series: Agriculture Issues and Policies
BISAC: SCI011000; SOC055000; TEC003070
DOI: https://doi.org/10.52305/MJDR1541

With the continuous decline of the area under cultivation and the increase in human population, one of the major challenges is to increase crop productivity to feed everyone. A major part of crop loss is attributed to different types of plant stresses (both biotic and abiotic). Hence by managing these stresses, we may increase the global production to ensure food security. Different approaches have been adopted in the recent past to reduce crop loss due to plant stress, but some of them like use of agrochemicals had significant ecological concerns. Thus, it was desired to protect the crop plants from different types of plant stresses in an eco-friendly, and environmentally sustainable manner.

In the natural environment, the plants are closely associated with the soil microbes. Some of them are already known to pro mote promote plant growth to a considerable extent. Several researchers have demonstrated that the inoculation of PGPR (Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria) is not only effective to enhance plant growth but also their tolerance towards different types plant stresses. Therefore, they have the capability to increase the plant growth even under the stressful environments. The present book therefore, is an up-to-date compilation of the role of PGPR in plant stress management in the form of 13 edited chapters, written by renowned researchers and academicians. The book deals with the different aspects of PGPR from their isolation, characterization, mechanisms of stress alleviation, and commercialization etc. Different mechanisms of different PGPR, their combinations with other soil micro- and macro-organism for an effective plant stress management have also been discussed. Overall this book is a whole-some package to describe stress management roles of PGPR reported till date.

Table of Contents

Foreword

Chapter 1. The Isolation and Characterization of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria
Anand Dave1 and Rakesh Kumar Sharma2
1
Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology Centre, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
2Department of Biosciences, Manipal University Jaipur, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

Chapter 2. PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) Mediated Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants
Nitika Kapoor2, Sakshi Verma3, Nishi Sondhi⁴, Renu Bhardwaj2and Priyanka Sharma1, 2
 1School of Bioengineering Sciences & Research MIT- Art, Design and Technology University, Loni, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India
3Department of Zoology, Hans Raj Mahila Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
⁴Department of Botany, DAV University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Chapter 3. Alleviation of Salt Stress Using PGPR
Palak Thakur1, Damini1, Kushal Thakur1, Kirti Raina1, Ruchika Kumari1, Rohit Sharma2, Rohit Sharma3, Randeep Singh⁴, Amandeep Singh⁵ and Ashun Chaudhary1
1Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Central University of Himachal Pradesh, Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, India
2Department of Forest Products, College of Forestry, Dr. Yashwant Singh Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India
3Department of Rasa Shastra and Bhaishajya Kalpana (Ayurvedic Pharmaceutics), Faculty of Ayurveda, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
⁴PG Department of Zoology, Khalsa College Amritsar, Punjab, India
⁵PG Department of Agriculture, Khalsa College Garhdiwala, Hoshiarpur, Punjab, India

Chapter 4. The Amelioration of Drought Stress Using Plant Growth-Promoting, Rhizobacteria (PGPR)
Anmol Sidhu, Neha Dogra, Shruti Kaushik, Gurvarinder Kaur, Isha Madaan, and Geetika Sirhindi
Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala, India

Chapter 5. Combinations of PGPR with Other Soil Micro- and Macro- Organisms for Improved Stress Tolerance in Plants
Narayan Singh1, 2, Vasudha Maurya1, 2, Indu Sharma3, Yogesh Kumar⁴, Rahul Kumar2, and Ashutosh Sharma2
1Department of Biotechnology, DAV University, Sarmastpur, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
2Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, DAV University, Sarmastpur, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
3Department of Life Sciences, University Institute of Sciences, Sant Baba Bhag Singh University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
⁴Department of Botany, Central University of Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Chapter 6. PGPR- Induced Systemic Resistance Against Biotic Stress
Lakhmir Singh1, Shalini Devi1, Ashutosh Sharma2, and Anju Pathania2
1Department of Biotechnology, DAV University, Sarmastpur, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
2Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, DAV University, Sarmastpur, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Chapter 7. Enhancing the Performance of PGPR via Vermitechnology for Plant Stress Management
Pooja Sharma1, 2,⁵, Palak Bakshi², Kamini Devi2, Tamanna Bhardwaj², Neerja Sharma2, Isha Madaan³,⁴, Rupinder Kaur⁵, Geetika Sirhindi3, Ashutosh Sharma⁶ and Renu Bhardwaj2
1Department of Microbiology, DAV University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
2Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India
³3Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, India
⁴4Government College of Education, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
⁵Department of Biotechnology, DAV College, Amritsar, Punjab, India
⁶Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, DAV University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Chapter 8. Halotolerant Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (HT-PGPR) for Sustainable Agriculture
Shivani Saini
Department of Botany, Goswami Ganesh Dutta Sanatan Dharma College, Chandigarh, India

Chapter 9. The Multiple Roles of PGPR in Environmental Sustainability: Bioremediation, Assisted Phytoremediation, and Plant Stress Tolerance
Swapnil Singh, Harleen Kaur, Neetu Jagota, Ravneet Kaur, Gurjit Kaur and Ashish Sharma
Department of Botany and Environment Science, DAV University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Chapter 10. The Role of PGPR in Bioremediation
Akhil Sharma¹, Monu Sharma², Shivika Sharma³, Amit Kumar⁴, and Vikas Sharma⁵
¹Department of Biotechnology, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
²Department of Biotechnology, Maharishi Markandeshwar (Deemed to be University),
Mullana-Ambala, Haryana, India
³Biochemical conversion Unit, SSSNIBE-Kapurthala, Punjab, India
⁴Kehloor Biosciences and Research Centre (KBRC), Ghumarwin, Bilaspur, H.P., India
⁵Department of Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering, Lovely Professional University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Chapter 11. Heavy Metal Resistant PGPR for Plant Protection
Shalini Dhiman¹, Kanika Khanna¹, Arun Dev Singh¹, Jaspreet Kour¹, Tamanna Bhardwaj¹, Kamini Devi¹, Neerja Sharma¹, Isha Madaan², ³, Geetika Sirhindi², and Renu Bhardwaj¹
¹Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India
²Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, India
³Government College of Education, Jalandhar, Punjab, India

Chapter 12. The Co-Inoculation Effect of Mycorrhizae Fungi and PGPR for Stress Tolerance
Kanika Khanna¹,², Nandni Sharma³, Talwinder Kaur ²,⁴, Jaspreet Kour¹, Tamanna Bhardwaj¹, Arun Dev Singh¹, Neerja Sharma¹, Sandeep Kour³, Kamini Devi¹, Puja Ohri³, and Renu Bhardwaj³
¹Plant Stress Physiology Lab, Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India
²Department of Microbiology, DAV University, Sarmastpur, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
³Department of Zoology, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India
⁴Department of Microbiology, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India

Chapter 13. ACC Deaminase Producing PGPR as Abiotic Stress Busters in Sustainable Agriculture
Talwinder Kaur¹,³, Sonika Sharma², and Kanika Khanna¹
¹Department of Microbiology, DAV University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
²Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, DAV University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India
³Department of Microbiology, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India

Index

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