Pediatric Simulation Handbook

Bridget Wild, MD (Editor)
Pediatric Simulation Program Director, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA
Clinical Assistant Professor, The University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Alisa McQueen, MD (Editor)
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, The University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine
Associate Chair for Education, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA

Joseph R. Hageman, MD (Editor)
Director NICU Quality Improvement, Comer Children’s Hospital, Senior Clinician Educator, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Ernest Wang, MD (Editor)
Alvin H. Baum Family Fund Chair of Simulation and Innovation, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA
Assistant Dean for Medical Education, Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Series: Pediatrics – Laboratory and Clinical Research
BISAC: MED069000

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$195.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Medical Simulation has become a standard training tool for novice providers and master clinicians alike. In a controlled environment, everything from communication skills to crisis resource management and procedures can be practiced and evaluated. The traditional “see one, do one, teach one” pedagogy is antiquated as high fidelity simulation experiences allow for a safer “see one, practice a few, do one, teach one.” This is especially embraced in the pediatric community where our patients are sometimes less cooperative and the stakes can feel emotionally heightened. This handbook represents lessons learned from hundreds and thousands of hours of personal experience with Pediatric Simulation and is appropriately rooted in the best evidence and shared knowledge in simulation literature.

This handbook is not meant to be a comprehensive overview of Pediatric Simulation. Those books exist. The journals are great. The communities of Pediatric Simulation experts are welcoming and beyond wonderful. This handbook is meant to be a pragmatic consult. If you are a brand-new simulation faculty member looking for an outline of best practices with practical tips for implementation, this handbook is for you. If you are a seasoned simulation veteran with good working knowledge of simulation wondering how to develop pediatric-specific programs, this handbook is for you. If you are a simulation tech or new operations staff trying to train and orient yourself, this handbook is for you. If you are trying to help make the case for a certain type of simulation program to stakeholders, this handbook is for you. We hope that sharing our personal wins and lessons alongside evidence reads as a consult or a helpful colleague.
(Imprint: Nova Medicine and Health)

Foreword

Preface

Chapter 1. You Think You Wanna Sim?
(Karen Mangold, MD, and Carmel Eiger, Departments of Pediatrics and Medical Education, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 2. Achieving Your Goals with Simulation
(Priti Jani, MD, Pediatric Critical Care, University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital Chicago, IL, US)

Chapter 3. Get with a Program
(Clare L. Desmond, MD, Emergency Medicine, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US)

Chapter 4. Strategies for Assessing the Learners’ Needs
(James Ahn MD, and Shruti Chandra, MD, Emergency Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 5. Choosing the “Right” Fidelity
(Clare L. Desmond, MD, Emergency Medicine, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US)

Chapter 6. Center-Based vs in Situ Simulation: Roles for Each
(Juveria Ahmad and Bridget M. Wild, MD, Simulation Technician, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)  

Chapter 7. Setting the Stage
(Elizabeth M. Lee, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, US)

Chapter 8. Running the Simulation 101: Take 1, 2, 3
(Cesar Menchaca, MD, Diana Mitchell, MD, and Alisa McQueen, MD, Pediatric Critical Care Division, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, US, and others)

Chapter 9. Running the Simulation 102: Expect the Unexpected
(Alisa McQueen, MD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Medical Center, Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, US)

Chapter 10. Debriefing 101: A Facilitator’s Guide
(Steven Carlson, and Bridget M. Wild, MD, Simulation Technician, Grainger Center for Simulation and Innovation, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)  

Chapter 11. Debriefing 102: Meeting Your Learners Where They Are
(Steven Carlson and Bridget M. Wild, MD, Simulation Technician, Grainger Center for Simulation and Innovation, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)  

Chapter 12. Pearls and Pitfalls: Tips to Help Create a Great Simulation Experience
(Robyn Bockrath, MD, and Mark Adler, MD, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 13. Unique Neonatal Topics (They’re Not Just Little Kids)
(Matthew Pellerite, MD, Neonatologist, Department of Pediatrics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US)

Chapter 14. Developing Simulations Focused on Patient Safety and Quality
(Elizabeth M. Lee, MD, Emergency Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, US)

Chapter 15. Procedural Skills Training Pearls
(Robert D. Schremmer, MD, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Center for Pediatric Simulation, Children’s Mercy, Kansas City, MO, US)

Chapter 16. Communication Skills Training Pearls
(Dalia Feltman, MD, and Lindsay Uzunlar, MD, Neonatologist, Northshore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 17. Tricks of the Trade: Interprofessional Education
(Connor Grotton, Carol S. Hasbrouck and Bridget M. Wild, MD, University of Toledo, College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, US, and others)

Chapter 18. Procedural Skills Training Examples
(Diana Hou Yan, MD, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Comer Children’s Hospital, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, US)

Chapter 19. Creating Superior Multi-Station Simulation Sessions
(Steven Carlson,Pamela Aitchison, Daniel Tarchala, Ernest E. Wang, MD, and Bridget M. Wild, MD, Simulation Technician, Grainger Center for Simulation and Innovation, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 20. Special Needs Case Report: Lay Caregiver Simulation as a Tool for Discharge Planning in the NICU
(Bridget M. Wild, MD, Lynn Mayberry, and Matthew M. Pellerite, MD, Pediatric Simulation Program Director, Department of Pediatrics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 21. Evaluating Your Simulation Program
(Ernest Wang, MD and Morris Kharasch, MD, Alvin H. Baum Family Fund Chair of Simulation and Innovation, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US, and others)

Chapter 22. That’s a Wrap
(Bridget M. Wild, MD, Pediatric Hospitalist and Pediatric Simulation Program Director, Department of Pediatrics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, US)

Index

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