Overcoming Domestic Violence: Creating a Dialogue Around Vulnerable Populations

Myra F. Taylor, PhD (Editor)
School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Australia

Julie Ann Pooley, PhD (Editor)
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia

Robert S. Taylor, PhD (Editor)

Series: Social Issues, Justice and Status

Clear

$350.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

eBook

Digitally watermarked, DRM-free.
Immediate eBook download after purchase.

Product price
Additional options total:
Order total:

Quantity:

Details

This book presents a range of interesting and diverse papers in order to demonstrate the importance and need for intervention programs that deal with the harmful effects that domestic violence causes to primary and secondary victims as well as to perpetrators. These papers reveal that the traditional within family home male-upon-female definitional understanding of domestic violence in the modern needs era to be broadened to include such experiences as dating violence, LGBT intimate partner violence and the childhood witnessing of domestic violence, to name but a few. Additionally, it is argued that intervention programs, given the scale of the domestic violence problem within society, need to be delivered in a non-gendered and non-stigmatizing manner to both the survivor and the perpetrator.

For, regardless of the gender of the perpetrator, it is the act itself of committing violence that needs to be eradicated. Moreover, it is argued that this eradication will best be achieved through eliminating the destructive construct of blame which is embedded within society’s understanding of domestic violence. The need to eliminate the harms blame is evident in the debilitating intergenerational transfer of the abused-abuser perpetrator label.

For embedded in this label is the suggestion that a cycle of violence exists in which maltreated children (i.e., children who have experienced or witnessed abuse) are destined to grow up to be abusive perpetrators of domestic violence and/or child abuse. The editors contend that the way forward lies in changing this embedded notion and in altering the public’s indifference or acceptance of domestic violence, educating the upcoming generation of youth on the unacceptability of fiduciary relationship violence and in creating resilient futures for both the primary and secondary survivors of domestic violence as well as for perpetrators.

The chapters are based on recent research conducted in different countries by researchers from multiple disciplines (e.g., medicine, social work, psychology, law, nursing, sexology, health sciences, education) situated in universities around the world (e.g., Australia, Canada, England, Lebanon, Scotland, Spain, and the United States of America). The book is comprised of seven separate sections that aim to provide diverse perspectives on the issue of domestic violence. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Introduction 1

Chapter 1 - Broadening the Domestic Violence Debate (pp. 3-8)
Myra F. Taylor and Julie Ann Pooley (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Section One: Defining Domestic Violence

Chapter 2 - The Definition and Nature of Domestic Violence (pp. 11-28)
Alfred Allan and Maria M. Allan (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Section Two: Dating Violence

Chapter 3 - The Prevention Paradigm and Young People’s Abusive Intimate Relationships (pp. 31-48)
Jane Ellis and Melanie McCarry (University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, England)

Chapter 4 - Youth Dating Violence: A Silent Epidemic (pp. 49-66)
Catherine J. Carter-Snell (Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada)

Chapter 5 - Dating Violence among Sexual-Minority Youth (SMY) in the Western World (pp. 67-84)
Martin Blais, Martine Hébert, Jesse Gervais and Félix-Antoine Bergeron (Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada)
Free Download Available

Section Three: The Female Perspective on Domestic Violence

Chapter 6 - Systemic Violence and Immigrant Women Having Escaped Domestic Abuse: Meaningfully Reducing Structural Barriers to Leaving Intimate Partner and Familial Violence (pp. 87-104)
Rita Isabel Henderson, Wilfreda E. Thurston and Amrita Roy (University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada)

Chapter 7 - Domestic Violence among South Asian Women: An Ecological Perspective (pp. 105-120)
Bushra Sabri (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America)

Chapter 8 - Domestic Violence: Prevalence among South Asian Migrant Women (pp. 121-138)
Neely Mahapatra and Mona C. S. Schatz (University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, US)

Chapter 9 - Coping with Domestic Violence in India: The Role of Spirituality and Social Support (pp. 139-154)
Andreia Schineanu and Jaya Earnest (Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia, and Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia)

Chapter 10 - A Feminist Perspective: System Responses to Australian Mothers Exiting an Abusive Relationship (pp. 155-170)
Elspeth McInnes (University of South Australia, Magill, South Australia, Australia)

Chapter 11 - Mississippi Still Burning: The LGBT Struggle for Intimate Partner Violence Protection under the Law – A Case Study in the Deep South (pp. 171-186)
Julie Schroeder, Olga Osby and Diana Bruns (Jackson State University, Mississippi, USA and others)

Chapter 12 - The Public Health Approach to Domestic Violence Prevention (pp. 187-204)
Damien J. Williams, Anna J. Gavine and John Carnochan (University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Scotland)

Chapter 13 - Domestic Violence against Women in War and Armed Conflicts (pp. 205-222)
Jinan Usta and Neil Singh (American University of Beirut, Riad El Solh, Beirut, Lebanon and others)

Chapter 14 - Violence against Women in Scenarios of Serious Economic Crisis (pp. 223-240)
Victoria A. Ferrer-Perez and Esperanza Bosch-Fiol (University of Balearic Islands, Spain)

Chapter 15 - Sport-Related Domestic Violence: Exploring the Complex Relationship between Sporting Events and Domestic Violence (pp. 241-258)
Damien J. Williams and Fergus G. Neville (University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Scotland)

Section Four

Chapter 16 - Child Maltreatment: A Phenomenological Study of Adult Males’ Recollected Childhood Memories of Experiencing Abuse and Witnessing Domestic Violence in the Family Home (pp. 261-280)
Myra F. Taylor, Teresa Goddard and Julie Ann Pooley (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Chapter 17 - ‘Walking on Thin Ice’: The Pervasive Degeneration of the Family Dynamic in Homes where Domestic Violence is a Lived Reality and Where Children under the Age of 18 Experience Abuse (pp. 281-298)
Myra F. Taylor, Teresa Goddard and Julie Ann Pooley (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Chapter 18 - ‘Feeling Like You’re Damaged and Like Your Life is Out of Your Control’: The Male Perspective on Living with the Adult Aftermath of Child Maltreatment (pp. 299-316)
Myra F. Taylor, Teresa Goddard and Julie Ann Pooley (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Chapter 19 - Endeavouring to Move Forward from Child Maltreatment by Engaging in the Therapeutic Process of Psyche Repair: The Adult Male’s Attempt at Establishing a More Fulfilled Adult Life (pp. 317-330)
Teresa Goddard, Myra F. Taylor and Julie Ann Pooley (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Chapter 20 - Overcoming the Gender Dyad: Engaging Men and Boys in Domestic Violence Prevention (pp. 331-348)
Lana Wells, Alina Turner and Merrill Cooper (University of Calgary, AB, Canada and others)

Section Five: Concluding Chapter

Chapter 21 - Concluding Thoughts: Domestic Violence and Possible Pathways Forward (pp. 351-358)
Myra F. Taylor and Julie Ann Pooley (Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia)

Section Six: Acknowledgments

Chapter 22 - About the Editors and Contributors (pp. 361-370)

Chapter 23 - About the School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Australia (pp. 371-374)

Section Seven: Index

You have not viewed any product yet.