Occurrences, Structure, Biosynthesis, and Health Benefits Based on Their Evidences of Medicinal Phytochemicals in Vegetables and Fruits. Volume 11

Noboru Motohashi, Ph.D. (Editor)
Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose-shi, Tokyo, Japan

Series: Food and Beverage Consumption and Health
BISAC: TEC012000

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In India and the surrounding countries, turmeric has long been used as a traditional folk medicine for treating and preventing various diseases as well as a spice for culinary purposes. Recent studies have shown that turmeric is effective as an antioxidant, antibacterial, antihypertensive, anti-diabetic and anti-myocardial infarction. In South America – particularly in Mexico –diverse tropical and subtropical fruits can be found. These fruits and herbs have been used as prescriptions for Mexican folk medicine. Among these formulations, mention is made especially of fruits and vegetables having cardiometabolic effects. Arthrospira maxima (spirulina) is generally known as an oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

The following chapters describe in detail preventions and treatments concerning medicinal fruits and herbs found in the abovementioned sites: Chapter One: “The Phytochemicals and Health Benefits of Curcuma longa Linn. (Turmeric) (Family: Zingiberaceae)”; Chapter Two: “Cardiometabolic Effects of Functional Foods and Phytochemicals within Mexican Folklore Medicine (Part 1)”; Chapter Three: Cardiometabolic Effects of Functional Foods and Phytochemicals within Mexican Folklore Medicine (Part 2)”; and Chapter Four: Arthrospira maxima (Spirulina): Protection against Mitomycin C-Induced Dominant Lethal Mutations. These chapters will provide more advanced information to researches in studying new drug designs of phytochemicals.

Preface

Chapter 1. The Phytochemicals and Health Benefits of Curcuma longa Linn. (Turmeric) (Family: Zingiberaceae) (pp. 1-156)
(Rao Gollapudi, Jyothirmayi Vadapalli, Anuradha Vanam and Noboru Motohashi)

Chapter 2. Cardiometabolic Effects of Functional Foods and Phytochemicals within Mexican Folklore Medicine (Part 1) (pp. 157-190)
(Diego Sierra-Puente, Claudia Stephanie Bárcenas-Cabrera, Marcos Meneses Mayo, Germán Chamorro-Cevallos, Marcela Hernández-Ortega and Gabriela Gutiérrez-Salmeán)

Chapter 3. Cardiometabolic Effects of Functional Foods and Phytochemicals within Mexican Folklore Medicine (Part 2) (pp. 191-234)
(Claudia Stephanie Bárcenas-Cabrera, Diego Sierra-Puente, Marcos Meneses Mayo, Germán Chamorro-Cevallos, Marcela Hernández-Ortega and Gabriela Gutiérrez-Salmeán)

Chapter 4. Arthrospira Maxima (Spirulina): Protection against Mitomycin C-Induced Dominant Lethal Mutations (pp. 235-260)
(Ricardo Pérez-Pastén, Nicole Pages, Leticia Garduño-Siciliano, Gabriela Gutiérrez-Salmeán, Oscar Guzmán-Gómez and Germán Chamorro-Cevallos)

About the Editor (pp. 261-262)

Index (pp. 263)

"Nutrition plays an important role in our complementary approach to health. This uniquely comprehensive and evidence-based book delivers detailed and systematic guidelines for healthier and beneficial dietary habits. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest that the consumption of a diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables is essential to maintain health. USDA’s dietary guidance system ‘MyPlate’ states that half of our plate should consist of fruits and veggies. For a 2,000-calorie diet, it is advised that our daily diet should contain two cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of veggies. The types of supplements available together with dietary sources are also explored.
A daily diet with sufficient quantity of fruits and vegetables has been linked to improved health. Veggies and fruits are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, fibre and antioxidants, which play an important function in protecting against chronic diseases like cardiovascular diseases and cancer. They are low in calories, making them a great choice to reduce one’s waistline. Selecting a colorful assortment of fruits and vegetables is preeminent, as different benefits exist in the different color spectrum. Volume 11 is comprised of four chapters dedicated to describing the health benefits of 1. Turmeric (Curcuma longa); 2. Cardiometabolic effects of functional foods and phytochemicals within Mexican Folklore Medicine (Part 1); 3. Cardiometabolic effects of functional foods and phytochemicals within Mexican Folklore Medicine (Part 2), and 4. Arthospira maxima (spirulina): Protection against mitomycin C-induced dominant lethal mutations.
In the first chapter, the author discusses the orthodox secondary metabolites present in turmeric rhizomes and other parts of the plant. Turmeric rhizomes and leaves are a rich source of terpenoids and polyphenols including curcumonoids. The authors suggested that the acceptable quantity of turmeric consumption does not meet our daily nutritional requirements vital for health. Hence, the health benefits of turmeric are experienced primarily from its secondary metabolites. Curcumin present as major constituents in rhizomes recently gained prominence for its anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Thus, this chapter describes how turmeric is recognized as a valuable produce in reducing or preventing microbial infections and cancers like colon and breast cancer.
The second and third chapters describe the cardiometabolic effects of functional foods and phytochemicals from Mexican Folklore Medicine. In these, the authors covered the chemistry and biological activities of cimmon bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), avocado (Persea Americana), maize (Zea mays), vanilla (Vanilla planifolia), chilli peppers (Capsicum spp) (Chapter 2) and chayote (Sechium edule), calabaza (Curcubata spp), agave (Agave spp) and Palama enana (Serona repens) (Chapter 3). In particular, the authors described the various products made from the agave plant and their constituents as well as their health benefits in greater detail. Agave is a valuable source in preparation of various products in Mexico. The plant is underutilized in other parts of the world.
In the final chapter, the authors present original research on antigenotoxic spirulina (Anthrozspira maxima). The protective effect of spirulina is linked to its antioxidant capacity and protection from anti-mutagenicity caused by mitomycin C. This chapter is comprised of original research findings which are usually found in journals.

In total, Volume 11 is an excellent source of information describing the health benefits of various components present in vegetables and fruits. All chapters include reliable information, collected from various research sources including some original findings. With such copious information, Volume 11 is an essential reference for everyone studying nutrition with a complementary health perspective as well as in libraries." - Rao Gollapudi, Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA.

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