New Research on Sleep and Sleep Disorders

Olivier Ratté (Editor)

Series: Sleep – Physiology, Functions, Dreaming and Disorders
BISAC: HEA043000

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$160.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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New Research on Sleep and Sleep Disorders first addresses how excessive daytime sleepiness is highly prevalent among patients with type 2 diabetes and has been associated with poorer glycemic control. Daytime sleepiness is also associated with cognitive and attention impairment which may lead to sub-optimal self-management and increased medication errors in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Sleep dysfunction has multiple causes in critically ill patients, some of which are extrinsic to the patient and some which are intrinsic to the patient. The disruption of sleep can further destabilize a patient or complicate their ICU course.
In one study, the authors use a network analysis technique to create networks for each of the four “insomnia identity” groups. These findings may help to further understand the role of daytime sleepiness in different insomnia phenotypes and to better target the clinical intervention.

Additionally, the results of a Multiple Sleep Latency Test carried out in forty patients diagnosed with narcolepsy-1 are presented, and protocol is reviewed.

Later, the role of upper cervical spine morphology in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea is examined. It is suggested that upper cervical spine morphology contributes to phenotypic differentiations between types of obstructive sleep apnea and thereby to its diagnosis, subdivision and treatment.

Some useful knowledge obtained by analyzing the acoustic properties of snoring sounds and the morphological properties of oropharyngeal soft tissues is presented. Snoring sounds and oropharyngeal soft tissues are directly or indirectly related to the severity of sleep apnea syndrome.

Many researchers are moving their attention towards the development of applications for the smartphone related to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. As such, this compilation analyzes and investigates the functionality of the most accredited apps available for smartphones.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery recommend surgery as an option for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, when non-invasive treatments such as CPAP or oral appliances have not been successful. Surgical treatment is more effective when there is an evident anatomical deformity that can be corrected to alleviate the respiratory obstruction.

The concluding study focuses on drugs which induce sleep, such as propofol and dexmedetomidine. Drug-induced sedation endoscopy is a relatively simple way to explore obstruction sites during induced sleep and to give the most precise indication for surgery.
(Imprint: Nova Medicine and Health)

Preface

Chapter 1. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Type 2 Diabetes
(Adriana Rusu, MD, PhD, Department of Diabetes and Nutrition Diseases, “Iuliu Hatieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

Chapter 2. Sleep Dysfunction in the Critically Ill
(Joey Carlin, Carl Boethel, Shekhar Ghamande and Salim Surani, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, TX, US, and others)

Chapter 3. Sleepiness Perception and Insomnia Identity: A Network Approach
(Daniel Ruivo Marques, Ana Allen Gomes, Vanda Clemente and Maria Helena Pinto de Azevedo, Department of Education and Psychology, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal, and others)

Chapter 4. The Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) in Narcolepsy-1
(J. J. Ortega-Albás, MD, R. López García, MD, M. Badenes Lengua, MD, S. Carratalá Monfort, MD, A. Martínez Martínez, MD, and P. Ortega, MD, Sleep Unit, Universitary General Hospital of Castellón, Castellón de la Plana, Spain)

Chapter 5. Upper Cervical Spine Morphology: A New Phenotypic Subdivision of Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea
(Liselotte Sonnesen, PhD, Dr. Odont, Department of Odontology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)

Chapter 6. Snoring Sounds and Oropharyngeal Soft Tissues: Some Typical Properties for Detection and Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea
(Tsuyoshi Mikami, Hirotaka Takahashi and Kazuya Yonezawa, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tomakomai College, Tomakomai, Hokkaido, Japan, and others)

Chapter 7. Applications for Smartphone in Sleep Obstructive Disorder Breathing
(A. Battaglia, MD, A. Mistretta, Md, A. Ceraso, MD, S. Gallina and F. Lorusso, MD, Unit of Otolaringology, Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Polyclinic University Hospital ‘‘Paolo Giaccone’’, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy)

Chapter 8. The Role of Surgery in the Treatment of OSAS
(F. Lorusso MD, A. Battaglia MD, A. Mistretta MD, and S. Gallina, Unit of Otolaringology, Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Polyclinic University Hospital ‘‘Paolo Giaccone’’, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy)

Chapter 9. The Role of Drug-Induced Sleep/Sedation Endoscopy (DISE) in the Detection of OSAHS
(A. Mistretta, MD, A. Battaglia, MD, S. Gallina and F. Lorusso, MD, Unit of Otolaringology, Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Polyclinic University Hospital ‘‘Paolo Giaccone’’, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy)

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