Myofibroblasts: Origin, Function and Role in Disease

$95.00

Analise Martinez (Editor)

Series: Cell Biology Research Progress
BISAC: SCI017000

Myofibroblasts play a major role in connective tissue remodeling by synthesizing the extracellular matrix (ECM) and by exerting contraction, both of which depend on complex and specific cell-matrix and cell-cell communications. Integrins are a major family of transmembrane receptors that directly link the intracellular cytoskeleton dynamics to extracellular structures via adhesions in all metazoans. In this book, Chapter One discusses major integrins that have an established role in the formation, function, and turnover of myofibroblasts associated with tissue remodeling. Chapter Two reviews the role of myofibroblasts in normal skin wound healing. Chapter Three summarizes the evidence for the presence and role of myofibroblasts in cancer progression and discusses the similarities of myofibroblasts in cancer and fibrosis. Chapter Four focuses on the role of bone marrow stem cells and bone marrow stem cell derived myofibroblasts in carcinogenesis and cancer development, and ways to inhibit the process of malignization. (Imprint: Nova Biomedical)

 

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Integrins: Form and Role in Myofibroblast Differentiation and Function
Qiang Ma, Jie Dong and Bridget Hindman (Receptor Biology Laboratory, Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, WV, USA)

Chapter 2. The Role of Myofibroblasts in Normal Skin Wound Healing
Véronique J. Moulin (Centre de recherche en organogénèse expérimentale de l’Université Laval/LOEX, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Département de chirurgie, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, and Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec – Université Laval, Axe médecine régénératrice, Québec, QC, Canada)

Chapter 3. Myofibroblasts in Cancer and Fibrosis: Two Sides of the Same Coin?
Bridget Hindman and Qiang Ma (Receptor Biology Laboratory, Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, WV, USA)

Chapter 4. Role of Bone Marrow Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Myofibroblasts in Carcinogenesis and Cancer Development, and Ways to Inhibit the Process of Malignization
Viktor Shtilbans (Integrated Oncology, LabCorp Specialty Testing Group, retired, NY, USA)

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