Mechanisms Behind Phytohormonal Signalling and Crop Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Vijay Pratap Singh, Samiksha Singh and Sheo Mohan Prasad (Editors)
Govt. Ramanuj Pratap Singh Dev Post Graduate College, Baikunthpur, Koriya, Chhattisgarh, India

Series: Environmental Science, Engineering and Technology
BISAC: SCI026000

Clear

$270.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

eBook

Digitally watermarked, DRM-free.
Immediate eBook download after purchase.

Product price
Additional options total:
Order total:

Quantity:

Browse Wishlist
Browse Wishlist

Details

Environmental stresses, such as heavy metals, drought, radiation, salts, pesticides, temperature, etc. are major factors collectively called abiotic stresses, which limit agricultural productivity. Abiotic stress factors negatively influence the survival, biomass production, and yield of staple food crops of up to 70%. In recent years, much attention has been given for developing strategies to alleviate the adverse effects of abiotic stresses on crops in order to fulfill the food demand of increasing population. Chemical application and agronomical crop management practices have been used to alleviate abiotic stresses with some success. During the last decade, extensive work has been carried out to understand plant hormone-mediated enhancement in abiotic stress tolerance using physiological, biochemical, genetic, molecular, and genomic approaches for crop breeding and management. This book has complied recent research on plant hormone mediated regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants with special emphasis on crops.

This book consists of fourteen chapters dealing with recent research made in the direction of plant hormone and abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. Chapter One deals with abiotic stress and crop productivity. Chapters Two and Three deal with the role of polyamines, ROS, and melatonin in the regulation of abiotic stresses. Chapter Four extensively elaborates the significance of the multigene family in the improvement of crops under stress conditions. Chapters Five and Six deal with the interaction of plant hormones and their subsequent impact on plant abiotic stress tolerance. Chapter Seven, Eight and Nine comprehensively deal with the role of abscisic acid and gibberellic acid signaling in the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. Chapters Ten through Thirteen describe the role of brassinosteroids cross talk, interaction and signaling in the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. Chapter Fourteen deals with the emerging role of oxylipins in the regulation of abiotic stress in crops. Chapter Fifteen deals with the role of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signaling in the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance.

This book has gathered recent information of plant hormone research and abiotic stress tolerance in crops. We hope that this book will be very useful for graduate and post graduate students and researchers.
(Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1. Abiotic Stresses and Crop Productivity
Talat Parween, Pinki Bhandari, Sumira Jan, and S. K. Raza (Institute of Pesticide Formulation Technology, Udyog Vihar, Gurgaon, India, and others)

Chapter 2. Polyamines and ROS: Understanding their Role in Plant Drought Homeostasis
Bhaskar Gupta, Tanaya Debmallik and Kamala Gupta (Department of Zoology, Government General Degree College, Singur, District Hooghly, West Bengal, India, and others)

Chapter 3. Melatonin as a Regulator of Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants
Aditya Banerjee and Aryadeep Roychoudhury (Post Graduate Department of Biotechnology, St. Xavier’s College (Autonomous), Mother Teresa Sarani, Kolkata, West Bengal, India)

Chapter 4. Multigene Engineering Strategies for Crop Improvement
Sukhmeen Kaur Kohli, Neha Handa, Resham Sharma, Harpreet Kaur, Vandana Gautam, Tajinder Kaur, A. K. Thurkal, Saroj Arora, Volodymyr Kravets, and Renu Bhardwaj (Department of Botanical and Environment Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India, and others)

Chapter 5. Interactions of Plant Hormones under Abiotic Stress
Shagun Bali, Poonam, Vandana Gautam, Sukhmeen Kaur Kohli, Anket Sharma, Vinod Kumar, Poonam Saini, Ashwani Kumar Thukral, Saroj Arora, Puja Ohri, and Renu Bhardwaj (Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India, and others)

Chapter 6. Plant Hormone Signaling and Drought and Salinity Tolerance
Nimisha Amist, Chanda Bano and Narsingh Bahadur Singh (Plant Physiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, India)

Chapter 7. Abscisic Acid Signaling and Abiotic Stress Tolerance
Shokoofeh Hajihashemi (Plant Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Behbahan Khatam Alanbia University of Technology, Khuzestan, Iran)

Chapter 8. Gibberellic Acid Signalling and Abiotic Stress Tolerance: Past and Present
Arup Ghosh, Khanjan Trivedi, Ranjeet Kumar, Denish Kubavat and Pradeep K. Agarwal (Plant Omics division, CSIR-Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute (Council of Scientific & Industrial Research) Gijubhai Badheka Marg, Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India)

Chapter 9. Crosstalk between Gibberellins and Abscisic Acid under Drought and Salinity
Analía Llanes, Celeste Varela and Virginia Luna (Laboratorio de Fisiología Vegetal, Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físico-Químicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Río Cuarto, Córdoba, Argentina)

Chapter 10. Brassinosteroids and Abiotic Stress Tolerance: Current Updates and Future Directions
Shikha Singh, Gausiya Bashri, Anita Singh and Sheo Mohan Prasad (Ranjan Plant Physiology and Biochemistry Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, India)

Chapter 11. Brassinosteroids Crosstalk with Other Hormones in Plants under Abiotic Stresses
Neha Handa, Resham Sharma, Poonam, Ravdeep Kaur, Vinod Kumar, Anket Sharma, Ashwani Kumar Thukral and Renu Bhardwaj (Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India)

Chapter 12. The Crosstalk of Brassinosteroids and other Hormones in Abiotic Stress Tolerance
Jana Oklestkova, Petra Koøínková and Miroslav Strnad (Laboratory of Growth Regulators, Centre of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Institute of Experimental Botany CAS & Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic)

Chapter 13. Brassinosteroids Signalling During Abiotic Stress Tolerance
Vandana Gautam, Dhriti Kapoor, Sukhmeen Kaur Kohli, Tajinder Kaur, Kanika Khanna, Saroj Arora, Puja Ohri, and Renu Bhardwaj (Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India, and others)

Chapter 14. Oxylipins Signalling in Plants Under Abiotic Stress
Parminder Kaur, Shagun Bali, Poonam Saini, Neha Handa, Adarsh Pal Vig, Puja Ohri, Ashwani Kumar Thukral, and Renu Bhardwaj (Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India, and others)

Chapter 15. Evaluation of Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Levels in Abiotic Stress Tolerance: Past and Present
Hilda Pedranzani and Ana Vigliocco (National University of San Luis and National University of Rio Cuarto, Argentina)

About the Editors

Index

You have not viewed any product yet.