Lifelong Engagement with Music: Benefits for Mental Health and Well-Being

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Editors:
Nikki S. Rickard (Monash University, Victoria, Australia)
Katrina McFerran (The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

Series:
Fine Arts, Music and Literature
Psychology Research Progress

Music psychology is the study of how humans experience and perceive music, and the impact this has on individuals, groups and communities. Engaging with music – whether by performing, creating, learning or listening – can have significant benefits across the lifespan. This book explores how music can promote mental health and functioning in diverse settings, from supporting cognitive development in premature babies to establishing identity and emotional well-being in adolescents, to enhancing brain function in adults and challenging cognitive decline in dementia patients. A lifespan approach is used to illustrate that the benefits of musical engagement need not be reserved for the vulnerable, but can also serve people of all ages to enhance health and well-being.

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Description

Preface pp. i-xv

Introduction
(Katrina McFerran and Nikki Rickard)

List of Reviewers

Author Biographies

Part 1 Benefits of music on mental health and well-being during development

Chapter 1. Frameworks for using music as a therapeutic agent for hospitalized newborn infants, pp. 1-20
(Helen Shoemark, The Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia and others)

Chapter 2. Musical development in infancy, 21-56
(Jacinta Calabro, Music Therapy, Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, Universuty of Melbourne, Australia)

Chapter 3. Non-musical benefits of school-based music education and training, pp. 57-72
(Anneliese Gill and Nikki Rickard,Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Australia)

Chapter 4. Educating amateurs: New technologies and models to enhance music participation in western societies, pp. 73-94
(Neil McLachlan, Music,Mind and Wellbeing, Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia)

Chapter 5. Music and adolescents, pp. 95-106
(Katrina McFerran, University of Melbourne, Australia)

Chapter 6. Musicking and the performance of gender: A double act, pp. 107-118
(Lucy O’Grady, University of Melbourne, Australia)

Part 2 Benefits of music on mental health and well-being in adulthood

Chapter 7. Music and neural plasticity, pp. 119-159
(Dawn Merrett and Sarah Wilson, The University of Melbourne, Australia)

Chapter 8. Reconceptualizing ‘musicianship’: Music performance and training through to music reception and engagement, pp. 161-180
(TanChyuan Chin and Nikki Rickard, Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Australia)

Chapter 9. The Mozart effect: An opportunity to examine the cognitive neuroscience of music listening, pp. 181-206
(Samia Toukhsati and Nikki Rickard, Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Australia)

Chapter 10. Music listening and emotional well-being, pp. 207-238
(Nikki Rickard, Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Australia)

Chapter 11. Music creativity and mental illness, pp. 239-251
(Denise Grocke, Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne, Australia)

Chapter 12. Music for dementia and Parkinson’s disease in the elderly, pp. 253-274, National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia)

Index pp. 275-291

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