Intellectual Property Infringement and Indigenous Innovation In China

$420.00

Hannes Schulze (Editor)
Emil Peters (Editor)

Series: Intellectual Property in the 21st Century, China in the 21st Century

Intellectual property rights (IPR) infringement in China reduces market opportunities and undermines the profitability of U.S. firms when sales of products and technologies are undercut by competition from illegal, lower-cost imitations. Intellectual property (IP) is often the most valuable asset that a company holds, but many companies, particularly smaller ones, lack the resources and expertise necessary to protect their IP in China. “Indigenous innovation” policies, which promote the development, commercialization and purchase of Chinese products and technologies, may also be disadvantaging U.S. and other foreign firms and creating new barriers to foreign direct investment and exports to China. In this new book, the U.S. International Trade Commission describes the principal types of reported IPR infringement in China, as well as Chinese indigenous innovation policies. (Imprint: Nova)

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Description

Table of Contents

Preface

China: Intellectual Property Infringement, Indigenous Innovation Policies and Frameworks for Measuring the Effects on the U.S. Economy
(U.S. International Trade Commission)

China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement and Indigenous Innovation Policies on the U.S. Economy
(U.S. International Trade Commission)

Index

Additional information

Binding

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