Innovation in Small Firms: Select Research on Activity and Capacity

$240.00

Henry Ivers (Editor)

Series: Business Issues, Competition and Entrepreneurship
BISAC: BUS000000

This book examines the extent to which product innovations stem from small, young firms versus large, established firms by analyzing the patenting behavior of public firms derived from the NBER-Compustat database and assembling a dataset of private and public firms from the Thomas Register of American Manufacturers. The Thomas Register evidence shows that small firms are surprisingly capable of inventing and managing products relative to large firms.

In 2002, small firms had an average of 10.01 products, while large firms had an average of 21.44 products; thus, small firms had on average half the number of products per firm compared to large firms. The NBER-Compustat evidence shows that small firms are more innovative per dollar of R&D than large firms, and the extent to which this occurs is decreasing in firm age; and young firms are more innovative per dollar of R&D than old firms, and the extent to which this occurs is decreasing in firm size. (Imprint: Nova)

Clear

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Preface

Product Innovations by Young and Small Firms
(Jose M. Plehn-Dujowich)

Patent Trends among Small and Large Innovative Firms during the 2007-2009 Recession
(Anthony Breitzman)

Innovation in Small Businesses: Drivers of Change and Value Use
(C.J. Isom and David R. Jarczyk)

An Analysis of Small Business Patents by Industry and Firm Size
(Anthony Breitzman and Diana Hicks)

Small Firms and Technology: Acquisitions, Inventor Movement, and Technology Transfer
(Small Business Administration, Office of Advocacy)

Small Serial Innovators: The Small Firm Contribution To Technical Change
(Small Business Administration, Office of Advocacy)

Index

Additional information

Binding

,