Higher Education in Hong Kong: Nurturing Students to be Caring Service Leaders

$190.00

Daniel T.L. Shek, PhD (Editor)
Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PRC
Public Policy Research Institute, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PRC
Department of Social Work, East China Normal University, Shanghai, PRC
Kiang Wu Nursing College of Macau, Macau, PRC
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America

Andrew M.H. Siu, PhD (Editor)
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P.R. China

Hildie Leung, PhD (Editor)
Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Core H, Hunghom, Hong Kong

Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc, (Editor)
Division of Adolescent Medicine, KY Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centers, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Series: Public Health: Practices, Methods and Policies
BISAC: EDU015000

In this book, some other attributes of service leadership and the related curriculum materials are introduced. The first one is moral character. While generic leadership competences are important, they are simply not enough. The reason is simple. Without moral character, greed and lust for power will dominate leadership and the related work. Therefore, moral character such as integrity, self-sacrifice, honesty and authenticity are emphasized. Although there are different models of character strengths, some universal commonalities can be found across different approaches, such as integrity in leaders. The second attribute is caring disposition which refers to valuing the needs and experiences of the service recipients and the habitat. In contrast to mere “customer service” or “industrialization” of service, caring disposition means concern and empathy for other people. Besides the two attributes, other service leadership attributes including self-leadership, relationship development and maintenance and mentorship are discussed, and it is our modest hope that other colleagues can have more understanding of the service leadership model proposed by the Hong Kong Institute of Service Leadership and Management, as well as the related curriculum so that more university students will benefit from service leadership education locally and globally. (Imprint: Nova)

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Table of Contents

Introduction (pp. 1-2)

Chapter 1. Higher Education Reform and Development of Leaders in Hong Kong (pp. 3-6)
Daniel TL Shek, Po PY Chung, Lu Yu, and Joav Merrick (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hunghom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Section One: Higher Education and Leadership (pp. 6-8)

Chapter 2. How to Foster Character Strengths (pp. 9-22)
Daniel TL Shek, and Lu Yu (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 3. Chinese Philosophy and Character Strength (pp. 23-36)
Daniel TL Shek, Rachel CF Sun and Ting Ting Liu (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 4. Caring Disposition: Awareness, Love and Nurturing (pp. 37-54)
Daniel TL Shek and Xiang Li (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 5. Creation, Development and Maintenance of Social Relationship (pp. 55-70)
Daniel TL Shek and Jocelyn L Lin (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 6. The Nature of Self-Leadership (pp. 71-82)
Daniel TL Shek, Cecilia MS Ma, Ting Ting Liu, and Andrew MH Siu (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 7. Mentorship (pp. 83-96)
Daniel TL Shek and Li Lin (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 8. Nurturing Students (pp. 97-110)
Daniel TL Shek and Xiang Li (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 9. Focus Group Evaluation of Service Leadership (pp. 111-122)
Daniel TL Shek, Moon YM Law and Ting T Liu (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 10. General Education Program in a New 4-Year University Curriculum in Hong Kong (pp. 123-136)
Daniel TL Shek, Lu Yu, Florence KY Wu, and Catalina SM Ng (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 11. Student Evaluation of a University Subject on Service Leadership (pp. 137-150)
Daniel TL Shek and Jianqiang Liang (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 12. Evaluation of a Leadership Training Program for Chinese Students (pp. 151-164)
Daniel TL Shek and Xiang Li (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 13. Student Evaluation of a General Education Program in Hong Kong (pp. 165-174)
Daniel TL Shek, Lu Yu and Joe TK Ngai (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 14. Teacher Evaluation of a New General Education Program at a University in Hong Kong (pp. 175-198)
Daniel TL Shek, Lu Yu and Wen Yu Chai (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Chapter 15. Evaluation of a General Education Program in Hong Kong based on Student Feedback Questionnaires (pp. 199-208)
Daniel TL Shek, Lu Yu and Xiao Ping Pu (Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PR China, and others)

Section Two: Acknowledgments (pp. 209-210)

Chapter 16. About the Editors (pp. 211-212)

Chapter 17. About the Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, PRC (pp. 213-214)

Chapter 18. About the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel (pp. 215-218)

Chapter 19. About the Book Series “Public Health: Practices, Methods and Policies” (pp. 219-220)

Section Three: Index (pp. 221-222)

Index (pp. 222-223)

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