Health Consequences of Human Central Obesity

Kaushik Bose, PhD (Editor)
Department of Anthropology, Vidyasagar University, West Bengal, India

Raja Chakraborty, PhD (Editor)
Department of Anthropology, Dinabandhu Mahavidyalaya, West Bengal, India

Series: Public Health in the 21st Century
BISAC: MED000000

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Obesity is now considered a global epidemic. Central obesity is the state of excess adiposity in the abdominal region. It is associated with increased, cardiovascular or cancer mortality. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recommended the assessment of central obesity mandatory for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Hitherto, there is a huge gap in our understanding of the role of central obesity as a health risk across different populations around the world. There also exist a vast population variation in the relationship between generalised obesity as measured by body mass index and /or percent body fat and the central adiposity measures. For instance, Asian-Indians have a typical phenotype of higher body fat at lower BMI levels compared to their European counterparts.

Development and use of region specific standards of measurement of central obesity is in need until a universal agreement is achieved. With this background, the present volume has been organized with some very informative articles from highly reputed scholars, researching on obesity in general and on central obesity, in particular. We have here articles based on empirical data as well some review articles critically examining some theoretical, epidemiological and clinical aspects pertaining to the theme of this volume. Through the 14 chapters of this volume, we have attempted to cover diverse aspects concerning the paradigm of central or abdominal adiposity / obesity within a broader framework of obesity. (Imprint: Nova Biomedical )

Preface

Chapter 1 - An Approach to Examine the Contribution of Waist Circumference to the Health Risks Attributed to Obesity in Adults (pp. 1-12)
Rodolfo Valdez and Sunkyung Kim (Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA)

Chapter 2 - Metabolic Cause of Obesity: The Role of Alanine Transaminase in Increasing BMI, Cholesterol, Blood Pressure and Blood Glucose (pp. 13-36)
James P. Grantham, Kaspar Staub, Frank J. Rühli and Maciej Henneberg (School of Medical Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Australia and others)

Chapter 3 - Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Obesity Related and Physiometric Traits among the Northwest Indians (pp. 37-54)
Krishan Sharma (Department of Anthropology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India)

Chapter 4 - Human Obesity from the Viewpoint of Evolutionary Medicine (pp. 55-70)
Sylvia Kirchengast (University of Vienna, Department of Anthropology, Vienna, Austria)

Chapter 5 - Role of Anthropometry in Assessment of Excess Adiposity and Metabolic Disorder in Asian Indians (pp. 71-84)
Nitish Mondal and Jaydip Sen (Department of Anthropology, Jadunath Sarkar School of Social Science, Assam University, Diphu Campus, Diphu, Karbi Anglong, Assam, and Department of Anthropology, University of North Bengal, Raja Rammohunpur, Darjeeling, West Bengal, India)

Chapter 6 - Menarche, Linear Growth, Nutritional Status and Central Obesity in 9 to 15-Year Old Girls in Merida, Mexico (pp. 85-94)
Sudip Datta Banik and Federico Dickinson (Department of Human Ecology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav) del IPN- Mérida, Yucatan, Mexico)

Chapter 7 - The Association of Central Fat Distributionwith Health Outcome in 14-Year-Old Boys and Girls in Wroclaw, Poland (pp. 95-112)
Aleksandra Gomula and Slawomir Koziel (Polish Academy of Sciences, Anthropology Unit in Wroclaw, Poland)

Chapter 8 - Secular Changes in Fat Topography in Children of the Russian North (pp. 113-134)
Elena Z. Godina, Irina A. Khomyakova and Ludmila V. Zadorozhnaya (Institute and Museum of Anthropology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia)

Chapter 9 - Central Obesity and Socio-Economic Status of School Children (10-12 Years) of Kolkata (pp. 135-150)
Satabdi Ghosh, Sutanu Dutta Chowdhury, Ananga Mohan Chandra and Tusharkanti Ghosh (Department of Physiology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India)

Chapter 10 - Impact of Age and Socio-Economic Status on Waist Circumference among Male Urban Slum-Dwellers Near Kolkata, West Bengal, India (pp. 151-162)
Raja Chakraborty and Kaushik Bose (Department of Anthropology, Dinabandhu Mahavidyalaya, Bongaon, West Bengal, and Department of Anthropology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore, West Bengal, India)

Chapter 11 - Factor Analysis of Anthropometric Variables As Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes: With a Special Reference to Central Obesity (pp. 163-170)
Jyoti Ratan Ghosh (Department of Anthropology, Visva-Bharati University, West Bengal, India)

Chapter 12 - Central Obesity and Hypertension in Urban Middle Class of Punjab (pp. 171-184)
Sharda Sidhu and Ramanpreet Randhawa (Department of Human Genetics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Punjab, India)

Chapter 13 - Relationship between Obesity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness among the Office Workers (pp. 185-206)
Amitava Pal, Sanghamitra Chatterjee, Sujaya De, Piyali Sengupta, Payel Maity, Monalisha Banerjee, Mousumi Chatterjee, Hiranmoy Mahata and Prakash C. Dhara (Ergonomics and Sports Physiology Division, Department of Human physiology with Community Health, Vidyasagar University, West Bengal, India)

Chapter 14 - Sleep Duration and Central Obesity among the Adults: A Case Study in Udaipur, Rajasthan (pp. 207-214)
Mithun Sikdar (Anthropological Survey of India, Western Regional Center, Udaipur, India)

Index

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