Handbook on Cassava: Production, Potential Uses and Recent Advances

Clarissa Klein (Editor)

Series: Plant Science Research and Practices
BISAC: NAT026000

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$360.00

Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Cassava produces about 10 times more carbohydrates than most cereals per unit area, and are ideal for production in marginal and drought prone areas. Cassava, which originated from tropical South America, is a perennial woody shrub with an edible root, which today is grown in tropical and subtropical regions of the world where it provides energy food and serves as a veritable source of food and income for over a billion people. This handbook provides new research on the production, consumption and potential uses of cassava. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1. Comparison of Cassava and Sugarcane Bagasse for Fuel Ethanol Production
Yessica Chacón Pérez, Daissy Lorena Restrepo Serna, Carlos Ariel Cardona Alzate (Instituto de Biotecnología y Agroindustria, Laboratorio de Equilibrios Químicos y Cinética Enzimática, Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Manizales, Manizales, Colombia)

Chapter 2. Cassava Production and its Economic Potentials in Sub-Sahara Africa
Emmanuel Ukaobasi Mbah (Department of Agronomy, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria)

Chapter 3. Cassava Production and Utilization in the Coastal, Eastern and Western Regions of Kenya
C. M. Githunguri, M. Gatheru and S. M. Ragwa (Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), Food Crops Research Centre Kabete, Nairobi, Kenya, and others)

Chapter 4. Socio-Economic Determinants of Modern Technology Adoption and the Influence of Farm Size on Productivity and Profitability in Cassava Production: A Case Study from South-Eastern Nigeria
Chidiebere Daniel Chima and Sanzidur Rahman (School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, UK)

Chapter 5. Cassava Flour as Alternative to Produce Gluten-Free Baked Goods and Pastas
Elevina Pérez, Lilliam Sívoli, Davdmary Cueto, and Liz Pérez (Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, and others)

Chapter 6. Technological Aspects of Processing of Cassava Derivatives
Elisa Cristina Andrade Neves, Daniela Andrade Neves, Kleidson Brito De Sousa Lobato, Gustavo Costa do Nascimento, and Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva Clerici (Food Engineering Faculty, Institute of Technology, Federal University of Pará (UFPA), Belém, Brazil, and others)

Chapter 7. Sustainable Management of Cassava Processing Waste for Promoting Rural Development
Anselm P. Moshi and Ivo Achu Nges (Department of Industrial Research, Tanzania Industrial Research and Development Organization (TIRDO), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and others)

Chapter 8. Wastewater from Cassava Processing as a Platform for Microalgae-Mediated Processes
Tatiele C. do Nascimento, Erika C. Francisco, Leila Queiroz Zepka and Eduardo Jacob-Lopes (Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS, Brazil, and others)

Chapter 9. Cassava Wastewater as Substrate in Biotechnological Processes
Cristiano José de Andrade, Ana Paula Resende Simiqueli, Fabiola Aliaga de Lima, Juliana Bueno da Silva, Lidiane Maria de Andrade, and Ana Elizabeth Cavalcante Fai (Department of Chemical Engineering, Polytechnic School, University of São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and others)

Chapter 10. Technical, Cost and Allocative Efficiency of Processing Cassava into Gari in Delta State, Nigeria
Brodrick O. Awerije and Sanzidur Rahman (School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, UK)

Chapter 11. Status of Cassava Processing and Challenges in the Coastal, Eastern and Western Regions of Kenya
C. M. Githunguri, M. Gatheru and S. M. Ragwa (Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) Food Crops Research Centre Kabete, Nairobi, Kenya, and others)

Chapter 12. Cassava Waste: A Potential Biotechnology Resource
Aniekpeno I. Elijah (Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Nigeria)

Chapter 13. Potential Uses of Cassava Products and Its Future Challenging Opportunities
Reddy T. Ranjeth Kumar, Kim Hyun-Joong and Park Ji-Won (Lab. Of Adhesion & Bio-Composites, Program in Environmental Materials Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

Chapter 14. Utilization of Modified Cassava Flour and its by-Products
Setiyo Gunawan, Zikrina Istighfarah, Hakun Wirawasista Aparamarta, Firdaus Syarifah, and Ira Dwitasari (Department of Chemical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia)

Chapter 15. Recent Advances in the Development of Biodegadable Films and Foams from Cassava Starch
Giordana Suárez and Tomy J. Gutiérrez (School of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Central University of Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, and others)

Chapter 16. Cassava Cultivation, Processing and Potential Uses in Ghana
Richard Bayitse, Ferdinand Tornyie and Anne-Belinda Bjerre (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Institute of Industrial Research, Accra, Ghana, and others)

Chapter 17. Potential uses of Cassava Bagasse for Bioenergy Generation by Pyrolysis and Copyrolysis with a Lignocellulosic Waste
Luciano I. Gurevich Messina, Pablo R. Bonelli and Ana L. Cukierman (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Depto. de Industrias, Programa de Investigación y Desarrollo de Fuentes Alternativas de Materias Primas y Energía (PINMATE), Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and others)

Chapter 18. Trend in the Trade of Cassava Products in the Coastal, Eastern and Western Regions of Kenya
C. M. Githunguri, M. Gatheru and S. M. Ragwa (Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) Food Crops Research Centre Kabete, Nairobi, Kenya, and others)

Chapter 19. Wild Relatives of Cassava: Conservation and Use
Marcio Lacerda Lopes Martins (Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Ambientais e Biológicas, Brazil)

Index

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