Gymnastics Performance and Motor Learning: Principles and Applications

$190.00

Thomas Heinen (Editor)
University of Hildesheim, Germany

Ivan Čuk (Editor)
University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Ruben Goebel (Editor)
Qatar University, Qatar

Konstantinos Velentzas (Editor)
Bielefeld University, Germany

Series: Sports and Athletics Preparation, Performance, and Psychology
BISAC: SPO017000

The book Gymnastics Performance and Motor Learning: Principles and Applications is a state-of-the-art discussion forum for topics that are of high interest in the field of gymnastics. Experts from different countries and with different scientific backgrounds such as psychology, pedagogy, training science, sports science, and movement science provide a number of significant contributions covering recent theoretical developments, current research evidence, as well as implications for practical applications concerning the different gymnastics disciplines. Topics discussed in the book include gymnasts gaze behavior in complex skills, spotting and guiding techniques, observational learning, augmented feedback, imagery, mental rotation, directional tendencies, interpersonal coordination, lost skill syndrome, performance indicators, as well as apparatus developments. Given the wide range of topics, Gymnastics Performance and Motor Learning: Principles and Applications may be an important source of information for graduate students, researchers, and practitioners (coaches and gymnasts) who work in the field of gymnastics. (Imprint: Nova)

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Relationships between Gaze Behavior and Motor Behavior in Complex Aerial Skills
Yusuke Sato, Konstantinos Velentzas, Thomas Heinen (College of Commerce, Nihon University, Japan, and others)

Chapter 2. Spotting and Guiding in Artistic Gymnastics from a Daily Practical Perspective
Rainer Schrempf and Damian Jeraj (State Coach of Swabian Gymnastics Federation, Stuttgart, Germany, and others)

Chapter 3. Observational Learning in the Context of Skill Acquisition
Carolin Braun (Research Centre for Physical Education and Sports of Children and Young People (FoSS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)

Chapter 4. Augmented Feedback for Movement Error Correction in Gymnastics
Juliane Veit, Damian Jeraj and Babett H. Lobinger (Institute of Psychology, German Sport University Cologne, Germany, and others)

Chapter 5. Imagery in Gymnastics: Theories and Empirical Findings
Bianca A. Simonsmeier and Cornelia Frank (University of Trier, Educational Psychology, Germany, and others)

Chapter 6. Motor Expertise and Mental Rotation Performance in Gymnastics
Käthe Bersiner and Thomas Heinen (Institute of Sport Science, University of Hildesheim, Germany)

Chapter 7. The Measurement of Mental Representations within the Context of Motor Actions
Linda Hennig, Konstantinos Velentzas and Damian Jeraj (Institute of Sport Science, University of Hildesheim, Germany, and others)

Chapter 8. Directional Tendencies in Artistic Gymnastics
Flavio Bessi, Dieter Hofmann, Christoph von Laßberg, and Thomas Heinen (Institute of Sport and Sport Science, University of Freiburg, Germany, and others)

Chapter 9. Interpersonal Coordination in Gymnastics
Thomas Heinen and Marc Nicolaus (Institute of Sport Science, University of Hildesheim, Germany)

Chapter 10. Lost Skill Syndrome in Gymnastics
Thomas Heinen, Mohammad Ghesneh and Hardy Fink (University of Hildesheim, Institute of Sport Science, Germany, and others)

Chapter 11. Performance of German Wheel Gymnasts and Artistic Gymnasts: Implications for Training Processes
Kathrin Schad (Institute of Professional Sport Education and Sport Qualifications, German Sport University Cologne, Germany)

Chapter 12. Uneven Bars Revolution – A Question of National Tradition and Motor Learning
Swantje Scharenberg (Research Centre for Physical Education and Sports of Children and Young People, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)

Index

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