Environmental Health Disparities: Cultivating Future Leaders

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I. Leslie Rubin, MD – Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine, Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine; Director, Break the Cycle Program, Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, Emory University; President and Founder, Break the Cycle of Health Disparities, Inc.; Medical Director, The Rubin Center for Autism and Developmental Pediatrics, Atlanta, GA, USA
Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc – Professor of Pediatrics at the Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel, Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky, Lexington, United States and Professor of Public Health at the Center for Healthy Development, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, United States, the former Medical Director of the Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem and the Founder and Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Israel

Series: Public Health: Practices, Methods and Policies
BISAC: MED116000
DOI: https://doi.org/10.52305/JWMK4075

This book is a compilation of eight chapters concerning the 17th annual Break the Cycle program.  The book begins with a general overview of the program and presents some recent data.The second chapter examines the outcomes of the Break the Cycle program from the perspective of one of its long-term mentors. The problems and impacts in Latin American communities are discussed in Chapter Three. In Chapter Four, the authors explain their findings from their systematic evaluation of studies of children’s blood Pb in the United States published since 2005. The authors conducted a research in Chapter Five to investigate the impact of consuming unfiltered private well water on children’s lead exposure. The authors’ purpose in Chapter Six was to identify the issues and health priorities of their patient group at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Pediatric Environmental Health Center (PEHC) to help guide visits. The goal of Chapter Seven was to determine if changes in a maternal education between birth and 15 years of age moderated the relationship between maternal health conditions and positive child health at age 15 years. The final chapter presents the outcomes of a study conducted in a pregnancy cohort in New York City, in which individuals were examined for exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during the third trimester of pregnancy.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. 17th Annual Break the Cycle of Children’s Environmental Health Disparities Program and Student Projects
I Leslie Rubin¹-⁵, MD, Abby Mutic³,⁶, APRN, PhD, Victoria Green³,⁷, JD MD, Rebecca Philipsborn²,³, MD, MPA, Melissa Gittinger³,⁸, DO, Jinbing Bai³,⁶, PhD, RN, Nathan Mutic³,⁶, Wayne Garfinkel³,⁹, BSCE, Henry Falk³, MD, MPH, Benjamin A Gitterman¹0, MD, and Joav Merrick¹¹-¹⁵, MD, MMedSci, DMSc
1Department of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
2Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
3Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
4Break the Cycle of Health Disparities Inc, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
5The Rubin Center for Autism and Developmental Pediatrics, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
6Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
7Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
8Georgia Poison Center, Grady Health System, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
9Retired EPA Region 4 Children’s Environmental Health Coordinator, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America
10Departments of Pediatrics and Public Health, George Washington University Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Health Services, General and Community Pediatrics, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington DC, United States of America
11National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
12Office of the Medical Director, Health Services, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem, Israel
13Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
14Kentucky Children’s Hospital, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America
15Center for Human Development, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

Chapter 2. Break the Cycle Program Outcomes: Perspectives from a Mentor
Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, PhD
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America

Chapter 3. Break the Cycle: Challenges and Impacts in Latin American Communities
Patricia M Valenzuela¹, MD, MSc, M Rosario Moore¹, MD, MSc, María Soledad Matus², MD, María I Eugenin¹, MD, Alejandra Nuñez-Palma¹, MD, and Javiera Martínez-Gutiérrez³,⁴, MD, MPH
¹Department of Pediatrics, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
²Pediatric Emergency Department, Department of Pediatrics, Clínica Alemana, Santiago, Chile
³Department of Family Medicine, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
⁴Department of General Practice, Faculty of Dentistry, Medicine, and Health Services, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 4. Factors Influencing Inequities in Lead Exposure in United States Children: A Systematic Review
Michelle Del Rio, MPH, PhD, and Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, PhD
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

Chapter 5. Characterizing Lead Exposure in Households that Depend on Private Wells for Drinking Water
Alyson Alde¹, MS, Frank Stillo², PhD, Abhishek Komandur³, MSPH, James Harrington⁴, PhD, and Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson⁵, PhD
¹Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America
²Geosyntec Consultants, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America
³Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America
⁴RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States of America
⁵Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America

Chapter 6. The More You Know: Insights from Integrated Pre-Visit Surveys in a Pediatric Environmental Health Center
Shalini H Shah¹-⁴,, DO, Alan D Woolf¹-⁴, MD, MPH, Kimberly Manning², MA, CHES, Faye Holder-Niles³-⁴, MD, MPH, Bridget Tully, BS¹-⁴, Shelby Flanagan²-⁴, MPH, Matthew C Spence², MPH, and Marissa Hauptman¹-⁴, MD, MPH
¹Pediatric Environmental Health Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
²Region ¹ New England Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
³Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
⁴Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Chapter 7. Increasing Maternal Education Modifies the Relationship Between Maternal Disorders During Pregnancy and Later Life Positive Child Health Among Individuals Born Extremely Preterm
Margaret Pinder
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America

Chapter 8. Factors that Influence Environmental Health Literacy from Returning Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure Results
Kylie W Riley¹,², MPH, Kimberly Burke¹, MPH, Anabel Cole¹,², MS, MPH, Maricela Ureno¹,², MPH, Holly M Dixon³, PhD, Lehyla Calero¹,², MS, Lisa M Bramer⁴, PhD, Katrina M Waters³,⁴, PhD, Kim A Anderson³, PhD, Julie B Herbstman¹,², PhD, MSc, and Diana Rohlman⁵, PhD
¹Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health, Columbia University, New York,
²Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York
³Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
⁴Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Labs, Richland, Washington
⁵School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Corvallis, Oregon, United States of America

Index

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