Environmental Health Disparities: Costs and Benefits of Breaking the Cycle

I. Leslie Rubin, MD (Editor)
Department of Pediatrics, Morehouse School of Medicine and President, Institute for the Study of Disadvantage and Disability, Atlanta, GA, USA

Joav Merrick, MD, MMedSci, DMSc, (Editor)
Medical Director, Health Services, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Adolescent Medicine, KY Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lexington, Kentucky, USA
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Jerusalem, Israel
Division of Pediatrics, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centers, Mt Scopus Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Series: Public Health: Practices, Methods and Policies
BISAC: MED078000

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$160.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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This book represents a body of work performed by students from a diverse set of disciplines and a variety of universities. Each project was developed by the students to “break the cycle” of social, economic and environmental health disparities. This book contains the projects from the tenth annual “Break the Cycle” program. “Break the Cycle” projects are designed to raise awareness among students of the reality of environmental health disparities and its impact on the world around them. Although the students may feel daunted by the magnitude of the challenge, they need to know that even the relatively small project they develop can make a big difference and becomes part of an inexorable process towards making the world a better place for all of its citizens.

The dictum that “It is not incumbent upon you to finish the task, yet, you are not free to desist from it” empowers the students to take on a challenge for a lifetime. We believe that the lessons learned by the students from their own projects, from working with the other students and from appreciating the difference that each little effort can make, goes significantly towards cultivating our future leaders. They are the people who will carry on the work and make the world a better place.
(Imprint: Nova)

Preface
pp. vii

Introduction
pp. 1

Chapter 1
The Costs and Benefits of Breaking the Cycle of Environmental Health Disparities
(Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Kurt Martinuzzi, Maeve Howett, Benjamin A Gitterman, Laura Wells, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, and Joav Merrick, Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America, and others)
pp. 3-18

Section One: Community Characteristics
pp. 19

Chapter 2
Environmental Risk Factors and Malnutrition in Children Under the Age of Five Living in Zambia
(Chalwe Chanda, and Nosiku S Munyinda, Environmental Health Unit, Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia)
pp. 21-32

Chapter 3
Racial Concentration and Access to Health Care in Georgia
(Shruthi Satyamurthy, and Daniel Montanera, Institute of Health Administration, J Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America)
pp. 33-44

Chapter 4
Living Near Nuclear Power Plants
(Christina Sauer, Julie Strominger, and Pamela Maxson, School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America)
pp. 45-56

Chapter 5
Asthma and African-American Children in Low-Income Communities
(Jasmine Williams and Saul Mofya, Department of Veterinary Science and Public Health, Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, Georgia, United States of America)
pp. 57-68

Chapter 6
Impact of Housing on Pubertal Timing
(Farah Dadabhoy, Maida Galvez, Ashley Pajak, Susan Teitelbaum, and Mary Wolff, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio and Department of Preventive Medicine and Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, United States of America)
pp. 69-82

Section Two: Pregnancy and Outcomes
pp. 83

Chapter 7
Thai Mothers Working in Agriculture: Effects of Heavy Metal Exposure on Endocrine-Related Hormones in the Neonates
(Grant A Walter, Parinya Panuwet, Tippawan Prapamontol, Warangkana Naksen, P Barry Ryan, Anne Riederer, and Dana B Barr, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Environmental Health Department, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America, and others)
pp. 85-94

Chapter 8
Prenatal Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure: Home Environment and Child Behavior Seven Years Later
(Madeleine B Hopson, Amy Margolis, Virginia Rauh, and Julie Herbstman, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, United States of America)
pp. 95-108

Section Three: Making a Difference
pp. 109

Chapter 9
In-Home Interventions to Reduce Pediatric Exposure to Asthma
(Justin Babino, Center for the Comparative Study on Metropolitan Growth, Collage of Law, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America)
pp. 111-126

Chapter 10
The Family Check-Up in a Pediatric Clinic and Behavior in the Home Environment
(S Courtney Smith, Karen E Schetzina, Jodi Polaha, Katie Baker, and David Wood, Department of Psychology, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, United States of America, and others)
pp. 127-138

Chapter 11
Exercise and Healthy Eating: Multi-Level Community Based Intervention
(Naeemah Ruffin, Sharon Levine, and Cappy Collins, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States of America)
pp. 139-156

Chapter 12
Preterm Survivors: Community Support to Lessen Health Disparities
(Amelia Dmowska, Bree Andrews, Michael Schreiber, and Michael E Msall, University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, and others)
pp. 157-168

Section Four: What Have We Learned?
pp. 169

Chapter 13
The Learning Experience of "Break the Cycle" Program: Survey of Past Students
(I Leslie Rubin, Danielle Oves, Janice Nodvin, Robert J Geller, Maeve Howett, Kurt Martinuzzi, Benjamin A Gitterman, Laura Wells, and Joav Merrick, Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America, and others)
pp. 171-186

Section Five: Acknowledgments
pp. 187

Chapter 14
About the Editors
pp. 189-190

Chapter 15
About the Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability
pp. 191-192

Chapter 16
About the Southeast PEHSU, Emory University
pp. 193-195

Chapter 17
About the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Israel
pp. 197-199

Chapter 18
About the Book Series “Public health: Practices, methods and policies”
pp. 201

Section Six: Index
pp. 203

Index
pp. 205-216

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