E-Government: Innovation, Collaboration, and Access

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Vincent T. Perillo (Editor)

The use of information technology to provide consistent access to and dissemination of government information is essential to promote a more citizen-centered government in a cost-effective manner. Agencies manage web-based technologies and services to help citizens obtain government information and services. In addition, agencies use information technology to communicate with the public and gather feedback to determine whether Federal programs are achieving results and meeting user needs. E-Government is the result of this use of information technology to improve citizen access to government information and services.

To ensure agencies apply E-Government principles and use information technology to the fullest potential, agencies measure results to verify progress and planned performance improvement. This allows agencies to better manage their information resources including their investments in information technology. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) works with agencies to systematically track and measure whether resources used by programs help achieve intended goals and results through the President’s Management Agenda (PMA) Scorecard each quarter.

The Federal Government continues to deploy industry-leading information technologies to more effectively manage and deliver government information and services. This results in more effective and transparent operations of Federal programs with an increased ability to manage the risks associated with information technology and protect information in care of the Federal government. Greater access to government information benefits the country by sustaining an informed citizenry, aiding government decision-makers, and supporting the economy, all of which are fundamental to a healthy democracy.

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Table of Contents

Preface

1. FY 2007 Report to Congress on Implementation of the E-Government Act of 2002
(Office of Management and Budget) pp. 1-57

2. Statement of Ari Schwartz, Center for Democracy & Technology before the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs on E-Government
(December 11, 2007) pp. 59-82

3. Electronic Rulemaking in the Federal Government
(Curtis W. Copeland) pp. 83-143

4. Reauthorization of the E-Government Act: A Brief Overview
(Jeffrey W. Seifert) pp. 145-161

5. Statement of the Honorable Karen Evans for Electronic Government and Information Technology, Office of Management and Budget before the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, December 11, 2007 pp. 163-182

6. E-Government 2.0: Improving Innovation, Collaboration and Access
(Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, December 11, 2007) pp. 183-184

7. Testimony of John Lewis Needham, Public Sector Content Partnerships, Google, Inc., Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Hearing on “E-Government 2.0: Improving Innovation, Collaboration, and Access (December 11, 2007) pp. 185-193

8. Testimony of Jimmy Wales, Wikipedia and of the Wikimedia Foundation regarding “E-Government 2.0: Improving Innovation, Collaboration, and Access” Before The U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (December 11, 2007) pp. 195-200

9. E-Government 2.0: Improving Innovation, Collaboration and Access, Statement of Chairman Joseph Lieberman, December 11, 2007 pp. 201-203

Index

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