Data Brokers and the Need for Transparency and Accountability

Stephen Beake (Editor)

Series: Business Issues, Competition and Entrepreneurship
BISAC: BUS000000

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$140.00

Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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This book is the result of a study of nine data brokers, representing a cross-section of the industry, undertaken by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to shed light on the data broker industry. Data brokers obtain and share vast amounts of consumer information, typically behind the scenes, without consumer knowledge. Data brokers sell this information for marketing campaigns and fraud prevention, among other purposes.

Although consumers benefit from data broker practices which, for example, help enable consumers to find and enjoy the products and services they prefer, data broker practices also raise privacy concerns. The FTC found that data brokers operate with a fundamental lack of transparency. The Commission recommends that Congress consider enacting legislation to make data broker practices more visible to consumers and to give consumers greater control over the immense amounts of personal information about them collected and shared by data brokers. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Chapter 1 - Data Brokers: A Call for Transparency and Accountability (pp. 1-102)
Federal Trade Commission

Chapter 2 - Statement of Jessica Rich, Director, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission. Hearing on ''What Information Do Data Brokers Have on Consumers, and How Do They Use It?'' (pp. 103-110)

Chapter 3 - Testimony of Joseph Turow, Professor, University of Pennsylvania. Hearing on ''What Information Do Data Brokers Have on Consumers, and How Do They Use It?'' (pp. 111-114)

Chapter 4 - Testimony of Tony Hadley, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs and Public Policy, Experian. Hearing on ''What Information Do Data Brokers Have on Consumers, and How Do They Use It?'' (pp. 115-120)

Chapter 5 - Testimony of Jerry Cerasale, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs and Public Policy, Direct Mark eting Association (DMA). Hearing on ''What Information Do Data Brokers Have on Consumers, and How Do They Use It?'' (pp. 121-130)

Chapter 6 - Information Resellers: Consumer Privacy Framework Needs to Reflect Changes in Technology and the Marketplace. Statement of Alicia Puente Cackley, Director, Financial Markets and Community Investment, Government Accountability Office. Hearing on ''What Information Do Data Brokers Have on Consumers, and How Do They Use It?'' (pp. 131-150)

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