Craniosynostosis and Rare Craniofacial Clefts: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes

Justine C. Lee, MD, PhD (Editor)
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, CA, USA

Series: New Developments in Medical Research
BISAC: MED107000

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Volume 10

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Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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Craniosynostosis and rare craniofacial clefts represent overlapping spectra of craniofacial disorders that present significant multi-system challenges in reconstructive surgery. Caused by the premature fusion of cranial bones, craniosynostosis may occur in isolation or as a part of a syndrome. The consequences of untreated craniosynostosis are significant to the neuropsychological development, as well as to the overall appearance of the child. Rare craniofacial clefts, unlike the common cleft lip and palate, frequently affect multiple functional units of the face. Similar to craniosynostosis, rare clefts may occur in isolation or as a manifestation of a rare craniofacial syndrome. For both entities, reconstructive complexity may range from routine to extraordinarily complex requiring multiple surgeries with the involvement of multiple disciplines.

In the ensuing chapters, 27 authors from the United States and abroad share their expertise on the current knowledge in craniosynostosis and rare craniofacial clefts. From the disciplines of plastic surgery/craniofacial surgery, neurosurgery, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, and orthodontics, comprehensive reviews of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis, syndromic craniosynostosis, genetic advances in craniosynostosis, orthodontic perspectives in dental rehabilitation, ophthalmologic perspectives in craniosynostosis, minimally invasive techniques, rare craniofacial clefts, treatment of craniofacial microsomia with an emphasis on microtia and atresia, treatment of pediatric facial nerve paralysis, and Treacher Collins syndrome are detailed. (Imprint: Nova Biomedical)

Preface

Chapter 1. Genomics of Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis
Irene J. Pien, Jessica B. Chang, Michael Januszyk, Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 2. Surgical Correction and Outcomes of Nonsyndromic Sagittal Synostosis
Nance Yuan, Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles
David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 3. Minimally Invasive Craniosynostosis Surgery
Jordan A Magarik and Christopher M Bonfield (Department of Neurosurgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA)

Chapter 4. Nonsyndromic Unicoronal Craniosynostosis: Characteristics, Surgical Methods, and Outcomes
Ginger C. Slack, Mark Gruszynski and Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 5. Metopic Craniosynostosis
Thomas D Willson and Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 6. Syndromic Craniosynostosis
Han Hoang, Rachel S. Mandelbaum and Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 7. Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction: Indications and Controversies
Cathy Tang, Deborah B. Martins and Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 8. The Treatment of Dentofacial Deformity in Syndromic Craniosynostosis
Ryann M. Christensen, Christoph E. Moschik, Sara Abedini, Tingxi Wu, and Richard Christian Solem (Section of Orthodontics, Division of Growth and Development, UCLA School of Dentistry, University of California Los Angeles, CA, USA)

Chapter 9. Orbital Morphology in Isolated Craniosynostosis and its Implications in Management
Zia Chaudhuri, Akila K Puncholothu, Ajay Sharma, and Joseph L Demer (Lady Hardinge Medical College, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India, and others)

Chapter 10. Rare Craniofacial Clefts
Rizal Lim (Burn and Reconstructive Centers of Florida, Kendall Regional Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA)

Chapter 11. Treacher Collins Syndrome
Elizabeth J. Volpicelli, Justine C. Lee and James P. Bradley (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA, and others)

Chapter 12. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis in Syndromic Craniofacial Patients
Jordan Kaplan, Elizabeth J. Volpicelli and Justine C. Lee (Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA)

Chapter 13. Treatment of Congenital Microtia and Aural Atresia
Akira Ishiyama and Justine C. Lee (Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA, and others)

Chapter 14. Facial Palsy in Children and Young Adults
Shai M. Rozen (Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA)

Index

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