Cowpea: Research Progress and Management Challenges

Božica Anđelo Nikolić (Editor)

Series: Agriculture Issues and Policies
BISAC: SCI011000

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Cowpea is a versatile crop that is well-adapted to poor conditions. This, combined with its high nutrition value, gives cowpea the potential to mitigate the effects of climate change and save millions of people from hunger and malnutrition.

Promising cowpea cultivars are under great threat for profitable cultivation due to the attack of factors such as: fungi, bacteria, viruses, nematodes, nutritional deficiency toxicity, water stress and temperature. Thus, this book reviews the present status of fungal and bacterial diseases of this important crop.

Next, recent developments about the plant are reviewed which show high recalcitrance to in vitro regeneration and genetic transformation, using different genes of interest, since the 1980s. The main focus of the study included a comparison of protocols for sterilization, types of explants used, growth mediums, cultural conditions, rooting, acclimatization and genetic transformation of cowpea. The authors also discuss the biological and pharmacological aspects of cowpea. Some health benefits include toning the spleen, stomach and pancreas, helping induce urination and relieving damp conditions. Cowpea contains the highest concentration of antioxidant compounds. It also has a small amount of iron, sodium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.

Next, this book focuses on how cowpea bean protein hydrolysates are obtained, their pharmacological activities and potential toxicity, as well as the potential inclusion of protein hydrolysates or biopeptides into products where they may act like health promoting functional foods/dietary supplements.

The authors propose that efforts should focus on the search for increasingly localized, highly effective inoculants adapted for particular cowpea cultivars over a given environmental setting. To demonstrate this, a review is included which analyzes some of the most pertinent challenges in the search and development of effective cowpea inoculants. In conclusion, research on the utility of cowpea based diets in domestic ruminants is reviewed, and the translational impacts of these studies for food security and safety and public health has been highlighted.

Preface

Chapter 1. Cowpea: Opportunities and Challenges under Changing Climate
(T. S. Moroke, K. Kashe, K. Dikungwa, O. Molosiwa, C. Matsuane and C. Nkomazana, Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Gaborone, Botswana, and others)

Chapter 2. Disease Management in Cowpeas
(Ritu Mawar and Satish Lodha, ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur, India)

Chapter 3. Plant Tissue Culture and Genetic Transformation Studies of Poor Man Crop Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.)
(Muhammad Aasim, Muhammad Sameeullah, Allah Bakhsh, Canan Sevinc, Sibel Day and Khalid Mahmood Khawar, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya, Turkey, and others)

Chapter 4. Biological and Pharmacological Activities of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) and Its Bioactive Components
(Heba I. Mohamed, Hossam S. El-Beltagi, Hany N. Yousef and Eman M. Fawzi, Department of Biological and Geological Sciences, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, and others)

Chapter 5. The Pharmacological Potential of Protein Hydrolysates from the Cowpea Bean (Vigna unguiculata L.Walp)
(Pablo Noé Núñez-Aragón, Gabriela Castañeda-Corral, Juan José Acevedo-Fernández, David Betancur Ancona and Luis Chel Guerrero, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, México, and others)

Chapter 6. Probable Challenges in the Development of Rhizobial Inoculants for Cowpeas
(Hamisi J. Tindwa and Ernest Semu, Department of Soil and Geological Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania)

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