Continuing Engineering Education Handbook

$230.00$362.00

Charles E. Baukal, Jr., PhD (Editor) – Director, Koch Engineered Solutions Institute, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Series: Education in a Competitive and Globalizing World
BISAC: EDU000000
DOI: https://doi.org/10.52305/ZRNH8663

The book is divided into four sections. Section One includes two chapters on history. Section Two concerns instructional design and contains five chapters. The first is on the learning preferences of working engineers. It presents the results of a study on the learning strategy and verbal-visual preference of engineers working in the oil and gas industry. Section Three focuses on CEE delivery and administration. The fourth and last section concerns the future of CEE and includes three chapters.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. Continuing Engineering Education
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.
Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 2. Fifty Years in Engineering Distance Education: Past Trends and Future Directions
Paul G. Jewell, Ann D. Thompson, Rema Nilakanta, Hiroyuki Iino and Darshana Juvale
Engineering LAS-Online Learning (ELO), Iowa State University, IA, USA

Chapter 3. Working Engineers’ Learning Preferences
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.¹ and Lynna J. Ausburn²
¹Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
²Professor Emerita, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 4. Incorporating Learning Styles into Continuing Engineering Education: A Process Heater Case Study
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.¹ and Wesley Bussman²
¹Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
²John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 5. Selecting Multimedia for Continuing Engineering Education
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.¹ and Lynna J. Ausburn²
¹Koch Engineered Solutions InstituteSM, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
²Professor Emerita, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 6. Effective Instructional Practices in Continuing Engineering Education
Howard S. Kimmel¹ (Ret.), Ronald H. Rockland² (Ret.), John D. Carpinelli³ and Gale T. Spak4 (Ret.)
¹Department of Chemical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA
²School of Applied Engineering and Technology, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA
³Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA
4Division of Continuing Professional Development, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA

Chapter 7. Virtual and Augmented Realities – Continuing Engineering Education
Dane Laughlin¹ and Brian Laughlin²
¹INVISTA- Koch Industries, Wichita, KS, USA
²The Boeing Company, Wichita, KS, USA

Chapter 8. Continuing Engineering Education Practices and Preferences
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.
Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 9. Live-Streamed Curricula in a Virtual-Demand World
Regina M. Godfrey
Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 10. Continuing Engineering Education in the Process Industries
Myra Fanning and Charles E. Baukal, Jr.
Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 11. Sourcing Continuing Engineering Education
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.
Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠, John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Chapter 12. Building a Sustainable Administrative Organization for Delivering Professional Programs to Working Adult Learners
Mitchell L. Springer
Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

Chapter 13. A Sustainable Future Through the 60-Year Curriculum
Amrit Ahluwalia
The EvoLLLution: A Modern Campus Illumination, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Chapter 14. Sustainability Education and Research in Action (SERINA): An IACEE Perspective for Sustainable Career Pathways in Engineering
Errol la Grange¹, Anthony Smith² and Ragna Ann Berge³
¹Cahoot Learning, Melbourne, Australia
²IACEE, Melbourne, Australia
³Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway

Chapter 15. Future Research Areas
Charles E. Baukal, Jr.
-Koch Engineered Solutions Institute℠ John Zink Hamworthy Combustion, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

Index

 

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