Constitution, Arbitration and Courts

Georgios I. Zekos, PhD
International Hellenic University, Serres, Hellas; BSc(Econ) Aristotle University, JD Democritus University, LLM, PhD(Law) University of Hull, PhD(Econ) University of Peloponnese, Greece

Series: Laws and Legislation
BISAC: POL040000

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$375.00

Volume 10

Issue 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Special issue: Resilience in breaking the cycle of children’s environmental health disparities
Edited by I Leslie Rubin, Robert J Geller, Abby Mutic, Benjamin A Gitterman, Nathan Mutic, Wayne Garfinkel, Claire D Coles, Kurt Martinuzzi, and Joav Merrick

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In “Constitution, Arbitration and Courts”, arbitration is examined as it began, as an extrajudicial mechanism for resolving disputes. Private arbitration predates the public court system. The ancient Sumerians, Persians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans all had a tradition of arbitration. Communities introduced arbitration systems intended to resolve their communal conflicts in accordance with custom, equity and internal law. Arbitration threatened a momentous basis of judicial business, as well as judicial jobs linked to the courts’ caseloads. Courts perceived the growing status of arbitration as a favored means for resolving business disputes and as a threat to their power. Courts have managed to get in the way of the arbitration process and to gain a role in arbitration. Thus, courts have taken the role of the guardian of public policy in a state, and so arbitration is considered not to be a safe, independent and fully alternative dispute mechanism. (Imprint: Nova)

Preface

Introduction

Chapter 1. The Historical Appearance of Arbitration as a Dispute Mechanism

Chapter 2. International Commercial Arbitration and Arbitration in EU Law

Chapter 3. Courts and ADR in the Rule of Law

Chapter 4. Constitution and Arbitration

Chapter 5. Arbitration and Courts in US Law

Chapter 6. Arbitration and Courts in English, Greek and Belgian Law

Chapter 7. The Function of Courts in US, English, Belgian and Greek Law

Chapter 8. Arbitration in the Rule of Law

Chapter 9. Arbitration Co-Equal and Fully Independent Alternative to Courts

Conclusion

Index

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